botanica

(redirected from Botanicas)
Related to Botanicas: Santeria

bo·tan·i·ca

 (bə-tăn′ĭ-kə)
n.
A shop that sells herbs, charms, and other religious or spiritual items, especially those associated with Santeria.

[American Spanish botánica, from Greek botanikē, feminine of botanikos, herbal; see botanical.]

botanica

(bəˈtænɪkə)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a shop that sells herbs, charms, and other items associated with alternative medicine or magic
References in periodicals archive ?
16, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Botanicas flourish in many U.
Latinos look to Botanicas for a holistic approach to treating their illnesses, welcoming theadvice offered by a healer who often speaks their language and understands their cultural traditions.
And that is just a sliver of the business done in Los Angeles, where psychic shops, botanicas and tarot readers operate out of homes and storefronts.
At Botanica Milagro in North Hollywood, spiritual healers have been booked solid from 9a.
Mercury is sold as "azogue" in religious stores, or botanicas, for use in Esperitismo (spiritual belief in Puerto Rico), Santeria (Cuban practices), and voodoo.
Of the 41 botanicas they located, 38 sold elemental mercury; in 1995, 35 of the 38 botanicas sold about 25,000-155,000 capsules or vials (mean weight, 9 g) for spiritual practices.
Mercury use in espiritismo: a survey of botanicas [Letter].
Ritual mercury is typically sold by botanicas in capsules without warning labels at a price between $1 and $2.
The sale of unlabeled mercury is banned by both federal law and the New York City health code, but that didn't stop 99 of 115 botanicas from selling it in a 1990 survey.
Clouds of smoke billow out of the door when you enter the Botanica Papa Chango in Bridgeport, Connecticut.
Metallic mercury is available at almost all of the 15 botanicas visited in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, but botanica personnel often deny having mercury for sale when approached by outsiders to these religious and cultural traditions.
A survey of 115 botanicas in 13 cities in the United States and Puerto Rico found that 99 sold mercury (1).