Bourbaki


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Bourbaki

(ˈbɔːbəkɪ)
n
(Mathematics) Nicholas Bourbaki the pseudonym of a group of mainly French mathematicians that, since 1939, has been producing a monumental work on advanced mathematics, Eléments de Mathématique
References in periodicals archive ?
Surjection is a term that Raqs draw from the fictional mathematician Nicolas Bourbaki in relation to set theory, which involves the subtle movement and shift of elements from one set to the other.
He is led to a discussion of the contributions of Paul Benacerraf and the Bourbaki school to set theory and of Emmy Noether's achievement in abstract algebra.
Zagier, Ramanujan's mock theta functions and their applications (after Zwegers and Ono-Bringmann), Seminaire Bourbaki.
Siebenmann, L'invariance topologique du type simple d'homotopie, Seminaire Bourbaki, 25e anee, 1972/73, n[degrees] 428, 186-209, 1973.
Bourbaki (1968) proposed to reconstruct the theories of mathematics dividing the structures of mathematics into three parts: main base sets, auxiliary base sets and typified sets.
Unsurprisingly, the book itself has a formalist structure, resembling as much a work by the Bourbaki group as anything else.
Actually they were developed following the model of axiomatic mathematical theories proposed by the Bourbaki Group in Paris.
In the twentieth century, modernism becomes entrenched in algebra with the structuralist approaches of Emmy Noether and Bourbaki.
By stating the non-Aristotelian premises in the set theory notation that we used (a Bourbaki algebraic dialect), we showed these premises as acceptable, as judged by the logical standards of set theory.
THE ARTIST AND THE MATHEMATICIAN: The Story of NIcolas Bourbaki, the Genius Mathematician Who Never Existed
In Chapter 4, titled "Bourbaki and Debreu," Weintraub shows how the formalist movement in mathematics arose in part as a result of the efforts of the Bourbaki school in France, whose goal in a series of volumes was to elucidate the basic structures that formed the foundations for all of mathematics, so that as their "immense project took shape in print over the decades, mathematics was presented as self-contained in the sense that it grew out of itself, from the basic structures to those more derivative, from the 'mother-structures' to those of the specific areas of mathematics" (p.
This type of precision stems from Roubaud's interest in the influential group of mathematicians who in the late 1930s began publishing under the collective pseudonym Nicolas Bourbaki, and who used similar principles of organization and references in their treatises.