Bourbon


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Bour·bon 1

 (bo͝or′bən, bo͞or-bôN′)
French royal family descended from Louis I, Duke of Bourbon (1270?-1342), whose members have ruled in France (1589-1793 and 1814-1830), Spain (1700-1868, 1874-1931, and since 1975), and Naples and Sicily (1734-1860).

Bour·bon 2

 (bûr′bən)
n.
A political reactionary, especially a conservative Democrat in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

[Partly in reference to the reactionary rule of the Bourbon family in France between 1815 and 1830 after its restoration to the monarchy, and partly in reference to the southern US origins of bourbon whiskey .]

bour·bon

 (bûr′bən)
n.
A whiskey distilled from a fermented mash containing not less than 51 percent corn in addition to malt and rye.

[After the region of Bourbon County, Kentucky, which formerly included much of the northeastern part of the state.]

bourbon

(ˈbɜːbən)
n
(Brewing) a whiskey distilled, chiefly in the US, from maize, esp one containing at least 51 per cent maize (the rest being malt and rye) and aged in charred white-oak barrels
[C19: named after Bourbon county, Kentucky, where it was first made]

Bourbon

(ˈbʊəbən; French burbɔ̃)
n
(Biography)
a. a member of the European royal line that ruled in France from 1589 to 1793 (when Louis XVI was executed by the revolutionaries) and was restored in 1815, continuing to rule in its Orleans branch from 1830 until 1848. Bourbon dynasties also ruled in Spain (1700–1808; 1813–1931) and Naples and Sicily (1734–1806; 1815–1860)
b. (as modifier): the Bourbon kings.

Bour•bon

(ˈbʊər bən, bʊərˈbɔ̃ for 1-3; ˈbɜr bən for 4 or, occasionally, for 3 )

n.
1. a member of a French royal family that ruled in France 1589–1792, 1814–1848. Branches of the family have ruled in Spain, Sicily, and Naples.
2. Charles, ( “Constable de Bourbon” ), 1490–1527, French general.
3. a person who is extremely conservative or reactionary.
4. (l.c.) Also called bour′bon whis′key. a straight whiskey distilled from a mash having 51 percent or more corn: orig. the corn whiskey produced in Bourbon County, Kentucky.

bourbon

- Named for Bourbon County, Kentucky, an American whiskey made from at least 51 percent corn, plus other grains (all bourbons are whiskey, but not all whiskeys are bourbon); whiskey is an alcoholic liquor distilled from grain, such as corn, rye, or barley, and contains approximately 40 to 50 percent ethyl alcohol by volume.
See also related terms for whiskey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bourbon - a reactionary politician in the United States (usually from the South)
extreme right-winger, reactionary, ultraconservative - an extreme conservative; an opponent of progress or liberalism
2.bourbon - whiskey distilled from a mash of corn and malt and rye and aged in charred oak barrels
whiskey, whisky - a liquor made from fermented mash of grain
julep, mint julep - bourbon and sugar and mint over crushed ice
3.Bourbon - a member of the European royal family that ruled France
Bourbon dynasty, Bourbon - a European royal line that ruled in France (from 1589-1793) and Spain and Naples and Sicily
ruler, swayer - a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
4.Bourbon - a European royal line that ruled in France (from 1589-1793) and Spain and Naples and Sicily
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
Bourbon - a member of the European royal family that ruled France
Henry IV, Henry of Navarre, Henry the Great - king of France from 1589 to 1610; although he was leader of the Huguenot armies, when he succeeded the Catholic Henry III and founded the Bourbon dynasty in 1589 he established religious freedom in France;
Translations

Bourbon

[ˈbʊəbən] (Hist)
A. NBorbón m
B. ADJborbónico

bourbon

[ˈbʊəbən]
A. NBorbón m (US) (also bourbon whiskey) → whisky m americano, bourbon m
B. ADJborbónico

bourbon

[ˈbɜːrbən] n (US) (also bourbon whiskey) → bourbon m

Bourbon

n (Hist) → Bourbone m, → Bourbonin f

bourbon

n (also bourbon whiskey)Bourbon m

Bourbon

[ˈbʊəbən] adj & nborbonico/a

bourbon

[ˈbʊəbən] n (Am) (also bourbon whiskey) → bourbon m inv
References in classic literature ?
Do nothing of the kind," said Don Quixote; "remember the true story of the licentiate Torralva that the devils carried flying through the air riding on a stick with his eyes shut; who in twelve hours reached Rome and dismounted at Torre di Nona, which is a street of the city, and saw the whole sack and storming and the death of Bourbon, and was back in Madrid the next morning, where he gave an account of all he had seen; and he said moreover that as he was going through the air, the devil bade him open his eyes, and he did so, and saw himself so near the body of the moon, so it seemed to him, that he could have laid hold of it with his hand, and that he did not dare to look at the earth lest he should be seized with giddiness.
In that memorable struggle for superiority between the rival houses of AUSTRIA and BOURBON, which so long kept Europe in a flame, it is well known that the antipathies of the English against the French, seconding the ambition, or rather the avarice, of a favorite leader,[10] protracted the war beyond the limits marked out by sound policy, and for a considerable time in opposition to the views of the court.
was Bourbon, knew so little of one another that it was not advisable to speak to one about the others.
There were too many English or French steamers of the line of Suez to Bombay, Calcutta to Melbourne, and from Bourbon to the Mauritius, furrowing this narrow passage, for the Nautilus to venture to show itself.
Louis de Bourbon, Prince de Conde, who, since the death of his father, Henri de Bourbon, was called, in accordance with the custom of that period, Monsieur le Prince, was a young man, not more than twenty-six or twenty-seven years old, with the eye of an eagle -- agl' occhi grifani, as Dante says -- aquiline nose, long, waving hair, of medium height, well formed, possessed of all the qualities essential to the successful soldier -- that is to say, the rapid glance, quick decision, fabulous courage.
The marquis presently replied that he had but a single political conviction, which was enough for him: he believed in the divine right of Henry of Bourbon, Fifth of his name, to the throne of France.
As to the time, it is easily fixed by the events at about the middle years of the seventies, when Don Carlos de Bourbon, encouraged by the general reaction of all Europe against the excesses of communistic Republicanism, made his attempt for the throne of Spain, arms in hand, amongst the hills and gorges of Guipuzcoa.
It is just to mix equal quantities of Mocha, of Bourbon coffee, and of Rio Nunez.
le Cardinal de Bourbon, who, for the sake of pleasing the king, had been obliged to assume an amiable mien towards this whole rustic rabble of Flemish burgomasters, and to regale them at his Hôtel de Bourbon, with a very "pretty morality, allegorical satire, and farce," while a driving rain drenched the magnificent tapestries at his door.
And believe me, they are reaping the reward of their betrayal of the Bourbon cause.
Why, look you, in the affair at Brignais some four years back, when the companies slew James of Bourbon, and put his army to the sword, there was scarce a man of ours who had not count, baron, or knight.
Bourbon or rye, or cunningly aged blends, constituted the pre- midday drinking.