bracken

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brack·en

 (brăk′ən)
n.
1. A fern (Pteridium aquilinum) found worldwide, with large, triangular fronds usually divided into three parts.
2. An area with dense thickets of this fern.

[Middle English braken, probably of Scandinavian origin; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

bracken

(ˈbrækən)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: brake any of various large coarse ferns, esp Pteridium aquilinum, having large fronds with spore cases along the undersides and extensive underground stems
2. (Plants) a clump of any of these ferns
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish bräken, Danish bregne]

brack•en

(ˈbræk ən)

n.
1. a large fern, Pteridium aquilinum, of the polypody family, having large, creeping rootstocks and triangular fronds.
2. a cluster of such ferns.
[1275–1325; Middle English braken < Scandinavian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bracken - fern of southeastern Asiabracken - fern of southeastern Asia; not hardy in cold temperate regions
fern - any of numerous flowerless and seedless vascular plants having true roots from a rhizome and fronds that uncurl upward; reproduce by spores
genus Pteridium, Pteridium - a genus of ferns belonging to the family Dennstaedtiaceae
2.bracken - large coarse fern often several feet highbracken - large coarse fern often several feet high; essentially weed ferns; cosmopolitan
fern - any of numerous flowerless and seedless vascular plants having true roots from a rhizome and fronds that uncurl upward; reproduce by spores
genus Pteridium, Pteridium - a genus of ferns belonging to the family Dennstaedtiaceae
Translations

bracken

[ˈbrækən] Nhelecho m

bracken

[ˈbrækən] n (= plants) areas of bracken → zones fpl de fougères

bracken

nAdlerfarn m

bracken

[ˈbrækn] n (plant) → felce f; (area of bracken) → felci pl
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, ensure that you do not confuse red water disease (babesiosis) with bracken fern poisoning.
Soon the trail followed a ridgeline that continued through the forest and eventually led to the first of several meadows that wowed us with lush bracken fern and blooming thimbleberries.
In addition to the tree leaves, rhododendron, iris, buttercup, yew, bracken fern, and rhubarb leaves are perhaps the easiest toxic plants to identify.
There are three main species of edible ferns: lady fern, bracken fern and ostrich.
Some of the plants to stay away from include bracken fern, dock, hemlock, locoweed, milkweed, mountain laurel, oak leaf, rhubarb, sorrel, wilted wild cherry, and under certain conditions (decreased light, fast growth after drought, heavy fertilizers) johnsongrass, pigweed, lamb's-quarters, and alfalfa can accumulate toxic amounts of nitrates.
Archaeological evidence suggests that in the cooler southern areas, the Maori relied on the rhizomes of bracken fern, which replaced the burnt forests.
Wilmshurst said archaeological evidence has suggested that successful cultivation of introduced food crops, such as kumara and taro, was only possible in warmer northern coastal areas and the starch-rich rhizomes of bracken fern, which replaced the burnt forests, provided an essential part of Maori diets in colder regions.
The intoxication can be seen as a direct answer to a complex multifactorial epidemiologic relation, where there is a narrow connection between the toxic principles of the bracken fern and the infection for bovine papillomavirus.
Bracken Fern (Pteridium aquilinum) Fiddleheads were formerly reported to be edible.