Bragg's law


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Bragg's law

 (brăgz)
n.
The fundamental law of x-ray crystallography, nλ = 2dsinθ, where n is an integer, λ is the wavelength of a beam of x-rays incident on a crystal with lattice planes separated by distance d, and θ is the Bragg angle.

[After Sir William Henry Bragg and Sir William Lawrence Bragg.]

Bragg's law

n
(General Physics) the principle that when a beam of X-rays of wavelength λ enters a crystal, the maximum intensity of the reflected ray occurs when sin θ = nλ/2d, where θ is the complement of the angle of incidence, n is a whole number, and d is the distance between layers of atoms
[C20: named after William and Lawrence Bragg]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence there is a reflection when the glancing angle satisfies Bragg's Law.
There's Wogan's Law, which proves that Luxembourg will always get deux points in Eurovision; Bragg's Law, which states that anyone who went to Oxbridge will always mention it within seven-and-a-half minutes of starting an interview; Parkinson's Law, which maintains that all chat show hosts are useless unless they come from Yorkshire.
where L is the correlation length, b is the length of the Burgers vector b, [sigma] equals |sin[psi]| where [psi] is the angle between the line vector l of the dislocation and the vector g, where g is the diffraction vector at which Bragg's law holds exactly for the reflection considered (length g; for cubic material it holds: g = ([h.