Bragg angle


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Bragg angle

n.
The angle between an incident x-ray beam and a set of crystal planes for which the secondary radiation displays maximum intensity as a result of constructive interference.

[After Sir William Henry Bragg and Sir William Lawrence Bragg.]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The molecular orientation of the PCL crystal (110 plane) was measured using the strongest reflection at the Bragg angle of 20 = 21.
where [theta] is the Bragg angle, p is the (002) peak width at half height
The other potential advantage of the TXRF technique stems from the fact that the grazing angle of incidence is much smaller than the Bragg angle, named after the father and son pair who received the Nobel Prize in Physics for this work in 1915.
Therefore, if the interplanar distance and the Bragg angle of the material without residual stresses are [d.
XRD patterns of thin compression molded sheets of PPCN were obtained by scanning over a Bragg angle (2[theta]), ranging froml-10[degrees] at a rate of 0.
Neutrons of each wavelength from the beamsplitter are then incident at the corresponding Bragg angle [[theta].
The wavelength ranges covered by the crystals used in WD spectrometers (as governed by the available Bragg angle range for the spectrometer design concerned) overlap to a certain extent (more between PET and LiF than between TAP and PET).
This approach assumes that the observed x-ray line is symmetrical around the peak maximum occurring at a Bragg angle characteristic of the analyzed emission.
B], it is best suited to the analysis of relatively sharp axisymmetric (fiber) texture, although the selection of high Bragg angle peaks allows relatively large orientation ranges to be probed.
As the Bragg angle is changed, the four dark regions indicated migrate together toward or away from the center of the crystal, consistent with a central nucleation point followed by homogeneous growth.