Bramin


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Bra´min


1.See Brahman, Brachmanic, etc.
References in classic literature ?
The Bramins and Pythagoras propounded the same question, and if any poet has witnessed the transformation he doubtless found it in harmony with various experiences.
What I have heard of Bramins sitting exposed to four fires and looking in the face of the sun; or hanging suspended, with their heads downward, over flames; or looking at the heavens over their shoulders "until it becomes impossible for them to resume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach"; or dwelling, chained for life, at the foot of a tree; or measuring with their bodies, like caterpillars, the breadth of vast empires; or standing on one leg on the tops of pillars -- even these forms of conscious penance are hardly more incredible and astonishing than the scenes which I daily witness.
Tenders are invited for Providing Storm Water Drainage To Bramin Falia At Silvassa
Pakistani Mah-ae Bramin, 25, who sold Mark a bus ticket to the holiday island of Phuket, is being held by police.
Officers chased Bramin over rooftops before catching him and then searching his home.
One of the first of Halhed's Indian poems, `The Bramin and the River Ganges', written while he was at work on his translation of the Code, was sent to Hastings on 22 May 1774.
The goddess Ganga reminds the forgetful Bramin of the successive waves of invasion and conquest that had proved the unmaking of India:
Voltaire understood him perfectly: in L'histoire d'un bon bramin (1759) he contrasts an "automaton" happy life with a thoughtful and therefore unhappy one.
However, see also Voltaire's short tale L'histoire d'un bon bramin, published the same year as Candide.
14) The value of the embankments that one wishes to oppose to this multitude being shrewdly calculated, they will cajole a part of this group to administer the necessary materials to construct that embankment, and the remainder will be destined to the proletariat, to prison, to slavery, to the slaughterhouse, and to be, in other words, either a helot in Sparta or a pariah among the Bramins or a Negro in the United States or an Indian in Calcutta or Irish in London.
What I have heard of Bramins sitting exposed to four fires and looking in the face of the sun; or hanging suspended, with their heads downward, over flames; or looking at the heavens over their shoulders "until it becomes impossible for them to resume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach"; or dwelling, chained for life, at the foot of a tree; or measuring with their bodies, like caterpillars, the breadth of vast empires; or standing on one leg on the tops of pillars, --even these forms of conscious penance are hardly more incredible and astonishing than the scenes which I daily witness.
And so on, and so on, for the better part of another page, until Thoreau has worked in references--and unfavorable comparisons--not only to the Bramins and Hercules, but also to Iolas and the hydra's head, to Romulus and Remus, to the Augean stables, to the New Testament, and to Deucalion and Pyrrha (the last complete with a two-line quotation from Ovid's Metamorphoses, both in the original Latin and in Raleigh's English translation).