branle

(redirected from Branles)

branle

(ˈbrænəl)
n
(Dancing) an old French country dance performed in a linked circle
[C17: from Old French branler to shake, variant of brandir to brandish]
References in periodicals archive ?
His grave branles gave way to the courantes' lighter steps.
De tres jeunes gens branles dans l'escalier, pour deux sous.
Would-be Squire's took part in axe, mace and sword training, which was followed by a session of courtly dancing, including the pavane, the farandole and the branles - all popular from that era.
top line only] G1 / g 28v [#83]: Sarabande / 77 G2 / F 28v [#84]: Sarabande, 80, de bouat G2 / d 28v [#85]: Sarabande [erased: de madame la comtesse de G1 / C bieule] 29r [#86]: Branles de Poitou / 108 premier / 2 / 3 / G2 / G/g Guay [4.
They began with the old measures, after that they daunced the Branles, then the Mr took his seat, & the Revellers daunced Galliards, Corantoes, & french daunces, then countrey daunces till it grew very late.
23) Rebecca Harris-Warrick indicates that the music used for the 1668 ball may resemble the suites in a manuscript collection of branles and courantes by Lully dated 1665 (LWV31), or the movements in the well-known Ecorcheville edition of suites.
For the less bloodthirsty, guests can join in with a variety of 14th Century courtly dances, such as the pavane, the farandole and branles.
To materials from Caroso's and Negri's treatises videotape artistic director Charles Garth adds dances from Thoinot Arbeau's French manual Orchesographie (1588): a pavan and galliard plus branles - circle-formation dances that frequently incorporate pantomimic gesture.
Il faut au surplus remarquer que de tout temps en chasque contree ou Prouince on a eu vne danse affectee, comme les Anglois les mesures et contredanses, les Escossois les Branles d'Escosse, les Alemans l'Allemande .
For "Basse danse," we are directed to see "Dances (keyboard)--before 1600"; once there, some thirty items are cited only by their numbers with no other indication of which one(s) may be the basse dances or the branles or the estampies.
There are 66 excellent pieces in French tablature from the beginning of the style brise, including preludes, fantaisies, passemaises, pavanes, gaillardes, branles, courantes, voltes and a substantial set of variations on Susanne un jour.
A group of pieces by the eccentric German-Italian Kapsberger come off well, as do the following Branles de village by Robert Ballard.