Brassaï

(redirected from Brassai)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Bras·saï

 (brə-sī′) Pseudonym of Gyula Halász. 1899-1984.
Transylvanian-born French photographer best known for his published collection Paris at Night (1933) and for photographing the studios of famous artists, including Picasso.

Brassaï

(French brasai)
n
(Biography) real name Gyula Halész. 1899–1984, French photographer, artist, and writer, born in Hungary: noted for his photographs of Paris by night
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, the operational issues of running a casino is something only foreign professionals could cover, such as details of the product mix and ways to optimise the casino floor, as covered by Robert Brassai of Kerzner International.
Unlike the photographs by Hungarian contemporaries Brassai or Andre Kertesz, or the enigmatic ones of Jacques-Andre Boiffard, which accompanied Andre Breton's Nadja (1928), Haussmann's Paris reveals itself only in the everyday life of the Sher-Gil rented apartment at 11 Rue de Bassano.
Highly regarded as a Surrealist photographer in the 1930s, Maar was a fellow student with Henri Cartier-Bresson and friends with Brassai, Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, and Andre Breton, the charismatic leader of the Surrealists.
Van der Elsken made his mark in 1956 with Love on the Left Bank, a cinema-verite-style immersion into Paris's bohemian underground, haunted by Brassai but anticipating Godard, Truffaut, and Goldin.
The photographers featured include Bill Brandt and Brassai (the pseudonym of Hungarian photographer Gyula Halasz).
Inspired by a Brassai photo from the 1930s, Prose's seductive tale of a permissive Paris between the wars is also a provocative exploration of identity and the search for acceptance.
Prose was inspired to write Lovers by the well-known photograph by George Brassai, "Lesbian Couple at Le Monocle 1932," of a butchfemme couple in a Paris cafe--particularly when she found out that the tuxedoed woman in the picture, Violette Morris, was a promising young French athlete who later became a Nazi collaborator.
Inicia con una cita del propio pintor espanol, quien respondio en una entrevista con el fotografo de origen hungaro Brassai (seudonimo de Gyula Halasz), la razon por la cual tenia obsesion por fechar todas sus obras:
From Lou and Inge; to Gabor Tsenyi, a Hungarian mama's boy based on Brassai, the photographer who took the infamous photo; to the wealthy baroness Lily de Rossignol, who patronizes Tsenyi and employs Lou to race her family's line of cars--the novel's cast of characters paint a portrait of the creative and deviant classes circulating in and around Paris in the '30s.
Brassai, Piko y Sterger hallaron en un grupo de adolescentes rumanos que el sentido de la vida cumplia un rol protector en materia de salud, disminuyendo significativamente comportamientos de riesgo (consumo de sustancias, promiscuidad, falta de ejercicio fisico, control de la dieta) y, asimismo, estaba fuertemente relacionado con el bienestar psicologico.
Conceived as nonfiction--when Prose, intrigued by the Brassai photo Lesbian Couple at Le Monocle, 1932, began to research the life of Nazi collaborator Violette Morris--the project wound up as a novel told through the fictionalized voices of real people, with commentary by a made-up biographer.