Breton


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Related to Breton: Breton language

Bret·on

 (brĕt′n)
adj.
Of or relating to Brittany or its people, language, or culture.
n.
1.
a. A native or inhabitant of Brittany.
b. A person of Breton ancestry.
2. The Celtic language of Brittany. Also called Armoric.

[Middle English, from Old French; see Briton.]

Breton

(ˈbrɛtən; French brətɔ̃)
adj
1. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Brittany, its people, or their language
2. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Brittany, its people, or their language
3. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Brittany, its people, or their language
n
4. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Brittany, esp one who speaks the Breton language
5. (Languages) the indigenous language of Brittany, belonging to the Brythonic subgroup of the Celtic family of languages

Breton

(French brətɔ̃)
n
(Biography) André (ɑ̃dre). 1896–1966, French poet and art critic: founder and chief theorist of surrealism, publishing the first surrealist manifesto in 1924

Bret•on

(ˈbrɛt n)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Brittany.
2. a Celtic language, akin to Cornish and Welsh, spoken in central and W Brittany.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Brittany, the Bretons, or the language Breton.
[1815–20; < French]

Bret•on

(brə tɔn)

n.
André, 1896–1966, French poet and critic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Breton - a native or inhabitant of Brittany (especially one who speaks the Breton language)
Breiz, Bretagne, Brittany - a former province of northwestern France on a peninsula between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay
French person, Frenchman, Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
2.Breton - a Celtic language of Brittany
Brittanic, Brythonic - a southern group of Celtic languages
Translations
bretoni
BretonBretonnebiniou
Breton
Bretónsky
bretonščina
Bröton

Breton

[ˈbretən]
A. ADJbretón
B. N
1. (= person) → bretón/ona m/f
2. (Ling) → bretón m

Breton

[ˈbrɛtən]
adjbreton(ne)
n
(= person) → Breton(ne) m/f
(= language) → breton m

Breton

adjbretonisch
n
Bretone m, → Bretonin f
(Ling) → Bretonisch nt

Breton

[ˈbrɛtn]
1. adjbretone
2. n (person) → bretone m/f; (language) → bretone m
References in classic literature ?
At the time of the "pardons," or Breton pilgrimages, the village festival and dances, he went off with his fiddle, as in the old days, and was allowed to take his daughter with him for a week.
Suzanne tripped with a light foot from the rue du Cours, by the rue de la Porte de Seez and the rue du Bercail, to the rue du Cygne, where, about five years earlier, du Bousquier had bought a little house built of gray Jura stone, which is something between Breton slate and Norman granite.
I have never seen him put to the test," replied Raoul, "but he is a Breton, which promises something.
This was a fortified city, on the island of Cape Breton, near Nova Scotia.
He prepared, then, to sup off a teal and a tourteau, in a hotel of La Roche-Bernard, and ordered to be brought from the cellar, to wash down these two Breton dishes, some cider, which, the moment it touched his lips, he perceived to be more Breton still.
Comes from the in'ards of Cape Breton, he does, where the farmers speak home-made Scotch.
Captain Brunot was a Breton, and had been in the French Navy.
Jupiter was clad in a coat of mail, covered with black velvet, with gilt nails; and had it not been for the rouge, and the huge red beard, each of which covered one-half of his face,--had it not been for the roll of gilded cardboard, spangled, and all bristling with strips of tinsel, which he held in his hand, and in which the eyes of the initiated easily recognized thunderbolts,--had not his feet been flesh-colored, and banded with ribbons in Greek fashion, he might have borne comparison, so far as the severity of his mien was concerned, with a Breton archer from the guard of Monsieur de Berry.
I gave her all my old clothes, even my old hats, though she always wears her Breton headdress.
Other poets followed, chief among them the delightful Chretien of Troyes, all writing mostly of the exploits of single knights at Arthur's court, which they made over, probably, from scattering tales of Welsh and Breton mythology.
Both herself and her husband had seen something of the larger world--he during the time of his service; while she had spent a year or so in Paris with a Breton family; but had been too home-sick to remain longer away from the hilly and green country, set in a barren circle of rocks and sands, where she had been born.
It was the advice of some of them to throw us all into the sea wrapped up in a sail; for their purpose was to trade at some of the ports of Spain, giving themselves out as Bretons, and if they brought us alive they would be punished as soon as the robbery was discovered; but the captain (who was the one who had plundered my beloved Zoraida) said he was satisfied with the prize he had got, and that he would not touch at any Spanish port, but pass the Straits of Gibraltar by night, or as best he could, and make for La Rochelle, from which he had sailed.