protactinium

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pro·tac·tin·i·um

 (prō′tăk-tĭn′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Pa
A rare, extremely toxic, radioactive, lustrous, metallic element having more than 30 known isotopes and isomers, the most common of which is Pa-231 with a half-life of 32,760 years. Atomic number 91; atomic weight 231.036; melting point 1,572°C; specific gravity 15.37 (calculated); valence 2, 3, 4, 5. See Periodic Table.

[prot(o)- + actinium (so called because it decays into actinium).]

protactinium

(ˌprəʊtækˈtɪnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a toxic radioactive metallic element that occurs in uranium ores and is produced by neutron irradiation of thorium. Symbol: Pa; atomic no: 91; half-life of the most stable isotope, 231Pa: 32 500 years; valency: 4 or 5; relative density: 15.37 (calc.); melting pt: 1572°C. Former name: protoactinium

prot•ac•tin•i•um

(ˌproʊ tækˈtɪn i əm)

n.
a radioactive, metallic chemical element. Symbol: Pa; at. no.: 91.
[1915–20]

pro·tac·tin·i·um

(prō′tăk-tĭn′ē-əm)
Symbol Pa A rare, extremely toxic, radioactive metallic element of the actinide series that occurs in uranium ores. Its most common isotope has a half-life of 32,500 years. Atomic number 91. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.protactinium - a short-lived radioactive metallic element formed from uranium and disintegrating into actinium and then into leadprotactinium - a short-lived radioactive metallic element formed from uranium and disintegrating into actinium and then into lead
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Translations
протактиний
protaktinium
protactinium
protaktiinium
protaktinium
protactinium
protaktinij
protactinium
protactinium
protaktinium
protaktinij
protaktinium

protactinium

n (Chem) → Protaktinium nt
References in periodicals archive ?
from Anthony Fitzherbert's sixteenth-century work, Natura Brevium.
69) The Writ of Prohibition was "directed to the ordinaries, and officers, and commissioners of the said court Christian, them commaunding to cease their plee": Natura brevium, 30; see also Gray.
30 (olim Holkham Hall, MS 754), Natura brevium, Brevia placita and other texts, with the ownership inscription of Sir Edward Coke; and Holkham Hall, MS 755, Natura brevium and other texts.