Bridges


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bridge 1

 (brĭj)
n.
1. A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway.
2. Something resembling or analogous to this structure in form or function: a land bridge between the continents; a bridge of understanding between two countries.
3.
a. The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
b. The part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests against this ridge.
4. A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
5. Music
a. A thin, upright piece of wood in some stringed instruments that supports the strings above the soundboard.
b. A transitional passage connecting two subjects or movements.
6. Nautical A crosswise platform or enclosed area above the main deck of a ship from which the ship is controlled.
7. Games
a. A long stick with a notched plate at one end, used to steady the cue in billiards. Also called rest1.
b. The hand used as a support to steady the cue.
8. Electricity
a. Any of various instruments for measuring or comparing the characteristics, such as impedance or inductance, of a conductor.
b. An electrical shunt.
9. Chemistry An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.
tr.v. bridged, bridg·ing, bridg·es
1. To build a bridge over.
2. To cross by or as if by a bridge.

[Middle English brigge, from Old English brycg; see bhrū- in Indo-European roots.]

bridge′a·ble adj.

bridge 2

 (brĭj)
n.
Any of several card games derived from whist, usually played by four people in two partnerships, in which trump is determined by bidding and the hand opposite the declarer is played as a dummy.

[From earlier biritch (influenced by bridge), from Russian birich, a call, from Old Russian birichĭ.]

Bridg·es

 (brĭj′ĭz), Harry 1901-1990.
Australian-born American labor leader. He organized the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union (1937) and served as its president for 40 years.

Bridges

, Robert Seymour 1844-1930.
British poet and critic who was appointed poet laureate in 1913. He is best known for his philosophical poem The Testament of Beauty (1929).

Bridges

(ˈbrɪdʒɪz)
n
(Biography) Robert (Seymour). 1844–1930, English poet: poet laureate (1913–30)

Bridg•es

(ˈbrɪdʒ ɪz)

n.
Robert (Seymour), 1884–1930, English poet and essayist: poet laureate 1913–30.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bridges - United States labor leader who organized the longshoremen (1901-1990)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Kutuzov fell back toward Vienna, destroying behind him the bridges over the rivers Inn (at Braunau) and Traun (near Linz).
He told stories about engineers leaping their trains over rivers without bridges, by putting on full steam; and many of those present avowed themselves of the engineer's mind.
He had several bridges under way in the United States, and they were always being held up by strikes and delays resulting from a general industrial unrest.
Marechal Victor, when he started, about nine at night, from the heights of Studzianka, which he had defended, as the rear-guard of the retreating army, during the whole day of November 28th, 1812, left a thousand men behind him, with orders to protect to the last possible moment whichever of the two bridges across the Beresina might still exist.
We went along merrily till we came to the toll-bar and the low wooden bridge.
The old stone bridge which spanned the stream was within a hundred yards of me; the setting sun still tinged the swift-flowing water under the arches with its red and dying light.
A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below.
I must stand a minute or two here on the bridge and look at it, though the clouds are threatening, and it is far on in the afternoon.
The Doctor began to wonder what they were going to make a bridge out of, and he gazed around to see if they had any boards hidden any place.
As he came to a little bridge across a dry ravine he saw the figure of a man standing upon it, clearly outlined against the gray background of a misty forest.
A long wooden bridge over the Derwent, the site of which, with one remaining buttress, is still shown to the curious traveller, was furiously contested.
I was on the bridge, and as we dropped from the brilliant sunlight into the dense vapor of clouds and on down through them to the wild, dark storm strata beneath, it seemed that my spirits dropped with the falling ship, and the buoyancy of hope ran low in sympathy.