Bridges


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bridge 1

 (brĭj)
n.
1. A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway.
2. Something resembling or analogous to this structure in form or function: a land bridge between the continents; a bridge of understanding between two countries.
3.
a. The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
b. The part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests against this ridge.
4. A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
5. Music
a. A thin, upright piece of wood in some stringed instruments that supports the strings above the soundboard.
b. A transitional passage connecting two subjects or movements.
6. Nautical A crosswise platform or enclosed area above the main deck of a ship from which the ship is controlled.
7. Games
a. A long stick with a notched plate at one end, used to steady the cue in billiards. Also called rest1.
b. The hand used as a support to steady the cue.
8. Electricity
a. Any of various instruments for measuring or comparing the characteristics, such as impedance or inductance, of a conductor.
b. An electrical shunt.
9. Chemistry An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.
tr.v. bridged, bridg·ing, bridg·es
1. To build a bridge over.
2. To cross by or as if by a bridge.

[Middle English brigge, from Old English brycg; see bhrū- in Indo-European roots.]

bridge′a·ble adj.

bridge 2

 (brĭj)
n.
Any of several card games derived from whist, usually played by four people in two partnerships, in which trump is determined by bidding and the hand opposite the declarer is played as a dummy.

[From earlier biritch (influenced by bridge), from Russian birich, a call, from Old Russian birichĭ.]

Bridg·es

 (brĭj′ĭz), Harry 1901-1990.
Australian-born American labor leader. He organized the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union (1937) and served as its president for 40 years.

Bridges

, Robert Seymour 1844-1930.
British poet and critic who was appointed poet laureate in 1913. He is best known for his philosophical poem The Testament of Beauty (1929).

Bridges

(ˈbrɪdʒɪz)
n
(Biography) Robert (Seymour). 1844–1930, English poet: poet laureate (1913–30)

Bridg•es

(ˈbrɪdʒ ɪz)

n.
Robert (Seymour), 1884–1930, English poet and essayist: poet laureate 1913–30.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bridges - United States labor leader who organized the longshoremen (1901-1990)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Jo remembered the kind old gentleman, who used to let her build railroads and bridges with his big dictionaries, tell her stories about queer pictures in his Latin books, and buy her cards of gingerbread whenever he met her in the street.
With other men he lived in a box car and away they went from town to town painting the railroad property-switches, crossing gates, bridges, and stations.
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
In some of the Arsacides they are used for beams whereon to lay foot-path bridges over small streams.
I floated down its historic stream in something more than imagination, under bridges built by the Romans, and repaired by later heroes, past cities and castles whose very names were music to my ears, and each of which was the subject of a legend.
The Castle looks down upon the compact brown-roofed town; and from the town two picturesque old bridges span the river.
All was as bare and ugly and uncomfortable as it well could be, for the villages along the river expended so much money in repairing and rebuilding bridges that they were obliged to be very economical in school privileges.
There were other trees in the garden, and one of the things which made the place look strangest and loveliest was that climbing roses had run all over them and swung down long tendrils which made light swaying curtains, and here and there they had caught at each other or at a far-reaching branch and had crept from one tree to another and made lovely bridges of themselves.
Bridges of wood and bridges of brick crossed the stream, and gave access to the house from all points of the compass.
Pip," said Wemmick, "I should like just to run over with you on my fingers, if you please, the names of the various bridges up as high as Chelsea Reach.
And she would drag him up above the clouds, in the magnificent disorder of the grid, where she loved to make him giddy by running in front of him along the frail bridges, among the thousands of ropes fastened to the pulleys, the windlasses, the rollers, in the midst of a regular forest of yards and masts.
The rains that are almost continually falling in this season make it impossible to go far from home, for the rivers overflow their banks, and therefore, in a place like this, where there are neither bridges nor boats, are, if they are not fordable, utterly impassable.