brink

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brink

 (brĭngk)
n.
1.
a. The upper edge of a steep or vertical slope: the brink of a cliff. See Synonyms at border.
b. The margin of land bordering a body of water.
2. The point at which something is likely to begin; the verge: "Time and again the monarchs and statesmen of Europe approached the brink of conflict" (W. Bruce Lincoln).

[Middle English brinke, probably of Scandinavian origin ; akin to Swedish brink brink, steep hillside, steep riverbank, and Middle Low German brink, hillside, grassland.]

brink

(brɪŋk)
n
1. the edge, border, or verge of a steep place: the brink of the precipice.
2. the highest point; top: the sun fell below the brink of the hill.
3. (Physical Geography) the land at the edge of a body of water
4. the verge of an event or state: the brink of disaster.
[C13: from Middle Dutch brinc, of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse brekka slope, Middle Low German brink edge of a field]

brink

(brɪŋk)

n.
1. the edge or margin of a steep place or of land bordering water.
2. any extreme edge; verge.
3. a critical point beyond which something will occur: on the brink of disaster.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old Norse (Dan)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brink - a region marking a boundarybrink - a region marking a boundary    
bound, boundary, edge - a line determining the limits of an area
2.brink - the edge of a steep place
edge, border - the boundary of a surface
3.brink - the limit beyond which something happens or changes; "on the verge of tears"; "on the brink of bankruptcy"
limit, bound, boundary - the greatest possible degree of something; "what he did was beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior"; "to the limit of his ability"

brink

noun edge, point, limit, border, lip, margin, boundary, skirt, frontier, fringe, verge, threshold, rim, brim Their economy is teetering on the brink of collapse.

brink

noun
1. A fairly narrow line or space forming a boundary:
Chiefly Military: perimeter.
2. A transitional interval beyond which some new action or different state of affairs is likely to begin or occur:
Translations
حافه، حافَّه، حَرْف، شَفيرُ الهاوِيَه
okrajpříkrý břeh
bredkant
parrasreuna
meredek part
brún, barmur, bakki
status krantas
krastsmala
randsteile rand
strmý svahzráz

brink

[brɪŋk] N (lit, fig) → borde m
on the brink of sthal borde de algo
to be on the brink of doing sthestar a punto de hacer algo

brink

[ˈbrɪŋk] nbord m
to be on the brink of sth [+ disaster, war, tears] → être au bord de qch
She was on the brink of tears → Elle était au bord des larmes.
on the brink of doing → sur le point de faire, à deux doigts de faire

brink

n (lit, fig)Rand m; on the brink of something (lit, fig)am Rande von etw; on the brink of doing something (lit, fig)nahe daran, etw zu tun

brink

[brɪŋk] norlo
on the brink of doing sth → sul punto di fare qc
she was on the brink of tears → era lì lì per piangere

brink

(briŋk) noun
the edge or border of a steep, dangerous place or of a river.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes they scrambled from rock to rock, up the bed of some mountain stream, dashing its bright way down to the plains; sometimes they availed themselves of the paths made by the deer and the mountain sheep, which, however, often took them to the brinks of fearful precipices, or led to rugged defiles, impassable for their horses.
Thus, during this October month of wonderful afternoons they roved along the meads by creeping paths which followed the brinks of trickling tributary brooks, hopping across by little wooden bridges to the other side, and back again.
Soon he was up again, and away,--not far into the country, but back towards London by the high-road--then back again--then over another part of the same ground as he already traversed--then wandering up and down in fields, and lying on ditches' brinks to rest, and starting up to make for some other spot, and do the same, and ramble on again.
A WEARY Traveller who had lain down and fallen asleep on the brink of a deep well was discovered by Dame Fortune.
If you knew how I feel on the brink of calamity at this instant, how afraid I am of myself
Immortal memories awake, and the dead years Through deathless voices answer to my strings, Till from the brink of Time's untarnished springs The melting night recalls me with her tears.
It takes root upon the brink of the grave, and blossoms in the jaws of death.
On the brink of some explanation, she seemed to recoil from it.
At length he summoned me by a low, "S-s-t," and I crept toward the sound of his voice to find him kneeling on the brink of an opening in the floor.
It was a bold question, and one which has ever been considered as a mystery; yet with how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries.
And as the dwarf came to the brink of it, he saw the two ducks whose lives he had saved swimming about; and they dived down and soon brought in the key from the bottom.
As soon as she came here, and saw the water, she stopped as if she had come to her destination; and presently went slowly along by the brink of the river, looking intently at it.