Received Pronunciation

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Related to British RP: British accent

Received Pronunciation

n.
A pronunciation of British English, originally based on the speech of the upper class of southeastern England and characteristic of the English spoken at private boarding schools and at Oxford and Cambridge Universities. Until the late 1900s, it was the standard form of English used in British broadcasting. Also called Received Standard.

Received Pronunciation

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) the accent of standard Southern British English. Abbreviation: RP

Received′ Pronuncia′tion


n.
a pronunciation of British English derived from the educated speech of S England, traditionally used in the public schools and at Oxford and Cambridge universities and widely used in broadcasting. Abbr.: RP
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Received Pronunciation - the approved pronunciation of British English; originally based on the King's English as spoken at public schools and at Oxford and Cambridge Universities (and widely accepted elsewhere in Britain); until recently it was the pronunciation of English used in British broadcasting
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
orthoepy, pronunciation - the way a word or a language is customarily spoken; "the pronunciation of Chinese is difficult for foreigners"; "that is the correct pronunciation"
Translations

received pronunciation

nhochsprachliche Aussprache

Received Pronunciation

npronuncia standard (dell'inglese)
References in periodicals archive ?
Since in contemporary British RP, the "o" in these words is pronounced [o[?
dialects; it can be pronounced weakly with the tongue forward, behind the upper front teeth [r] as in Network Standard; it can be trilled or burred in the same position [rr] as in Scots English; it can also be slurred in this position to become the schwa [e] (the indeterminate sound of unstressed vowels), which blends with the preceding vowel, as in British RP, New England, and working class accents in the Northeastern U.
Ann Walsh, of Franklin Road, Whitnash, former Leamington branch leader of the British RP (Retinitis Pigmentosa) Society, has joined forces with her friend Gil Priest, of Broadway, Cubbington, to organise the event.

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