Brocage


Also found in: Legal.
Related to Brocage: brocade, Bocage

Bro´cage


n.1.See Brokkerage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poore POET-APE, that would be thought our chiefe, Whose workes are eene the fripperie of wit, From brocage is become so bold a thiefe, As we, the rob'd, leave rage, and pittie it.
He thus heaps preemptive scorn upon figures like the "Poet-ape" of Epigram 61, who "From brocage is become so bold a thiefe, / As we, the rob'd, leaue rage, and pittie it" (3-4); and "Proule the Plagiary" (Epigram 81), who claims the authorship of "all [he] hears" (5), and to whom Jonson therefore refuses to recite his verse; and "Play-Wright" (Epigram 100), of whom Jonson remarks that "Fiue of my iests, then stolne, past him a play" (4).
He thus heaps preemptive scorn upon figures like the "Poet-Ape" of Epigram 61, who "From brocage is become so bold a thiefe, / As we, the rob'd, leaue rage, and pittie it" (3-4); and "Proule the Plagiary" (Epigram 81), who claims the author- of "all [he] hears" (5), and to whom Jonson therefore refuses to recite his verse; and "Play-Wright" (Epigram 100), of whom Jonson remarks that "Fiue of my iests, then stolne, past him a play" (4).