Bronze Age

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Related to Bronze Ages: Early Bronze Age

Bronze Age

n.
A period of human culture between the Stone Age and the Iron Age, characterized by the use of weapons and implements made of bronze. See Usage Note at Three Age system.

bronze age

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a period of human existence marked by war and violence, following the golden and silver ages and preceding the iron age

Bronze Age

n
(Archaeology) archaeol
a. a technological stage between the Stone and Iron Ages, beginning in the Middle East about 4500 bc and lasting in Britain from about 2000 to 500 bc, during which weapons and tools were made of bronze and there was intensive trading
b. (as modifier): a Bronze-Age tool.

Bronze′ Age`


n.
a period in the history of humankind, following the Stone Age and preceding the Iron Age, during which bronze weapons and implements were used: representative Old World cultures are the Minoan and Mycenaean.
[1860–65]

Bronze Age

The period between the Stone Age and the Iron Age during which people discovered how to make tools and weapons from bronze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
prehistoric culture, prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
2.bronze age - (classical mythology) the third age of the world, marked by war and violence
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Translations
pronssikausi
bronstijd

Bronze Age

n the Bronze Agel'età del bronzo
References in periodicals archive ?
The comprehensive account of facts leading to his chronological system and periodisation, particularly his interpretation and discussion of socio-economic processes and developments, were all grounded on archaeological objects, types and groups from Bronze Ages settlement sites.
Chapters 3-7, the core of the book, deal with the four main periods: Palaeolithic-Early Aceramic Neolithic, the Late Aceramic and Ceramic Neolithic, the Chalcolithic, the Prehistoric and the Protohistoric Bronze Ages; the treatment of each Bronze Age period is concluded with its own separate overview.
Textiles, which date back to the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, have strong egalitarian roots and an ancient connection with personal expression (3).
The interaction between cultural/political entities and metalworking in western Anatolia during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Ages, in 115.
This paper focuses on the material that dates from the Middle and Late Bronze Ages.
Natural increase in a stable population alone is clearly insufficient to account for the growth in size of the Deneia cemeteries from the Early to the Middle Bronze Ages.
The evidence is soberly assessed, but as Tartaron would be the first to acknowledge, only new excavation will give us a reliable understanding of the Early and Middle Bronze Ages.
The first of these, the Early and Middle Bronze Ages (c.
In recent years there has been considerable debate over the definition of Canaan in the Late Bronze Age, but there is no doubt that in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages (c.
This demographic shift between Copper and Bronze Ages seems to be correlated with a change in the territorial distribution of the population.
The book as it is titled is somewhat misleading, in that it only covers the Neolithic and Bronze Ages of the Northeast; the former essentially dates between 6000 and 2000 BC:, while the latter begins in some areas at 2000 BC but most finds fall in the mid 1st millennium BC.
Glatz and her collaborators have recognized in Late Bronze Age Paphlagonia a "system of communication and control" indicative of a contested frontier region.