Brooks


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brook 1

 (bro͝ok)
n. Chiefly Northeastern US
See creek. See Note at run.

[Middle English, from Old English brōc.]

brook 2

 (bro͝ok)
tr.v. brooked, brook·ing, brooks
To put up with; tolerate: We will brook no further argument.

[Middle English brouken, from Old English brūcan, to use, enjoy.]

Brooks

 (bro͝oks), Gwendolyn Elizabeth 1917-2000.
American poet known for her verse detailing the dreams and struggles of African Americans. An early volume of poems, Annie Allen (1949), was awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

Brooks

, Mel Born 1926.
American director, actor, and writer noted for the broad humor of his film comedies such as The Producers (1968), which he adapted for Broadway in 2001.

Brooks

, Van Wyck 1886-1963.
American literary historian, critic, and translator who wrote many books on the literary history of America, including The Flowering of New England (1936), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize.

Brooks

(brʊks)
n
1. (Biography) Geraldine. born 1955, Australian writer. Her novels include March (2005), which won the Pulitzer prize
2. (Biography) Mel, real name Melvyn Kaminsky. born 1926, US comedy writer, actor, and film director. His films include The Producers (1968), Blazing Saddles (1974), High Anxiety (1977), and Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1996)
3. (Biography) (Troyal) Garth. born 1962, US country singer and songwriter; his bestselling records include Ropin' the Wind (1991) and Scarecrow (2001)

Brooks

(brʊks)

n.
1. Gwendolyn, 1917–2000, U.S. poet and novelist.
2. Phillips, 1835–93, U.S. Protestant Episcopal bishop and orator.
3. Van Wyck (waɪk) 1886–1963, U.S. author and critic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brooks - United States literary critic and historian (1886-1963)
References in classic literature ?
With the sun for his only guide, or aided by such blind marks as are only known to the sagacity of a native, he held his way along the barrens of pine, through occasional little fertile vales, across brooks and rivulets, and over undulating hills, with the accuracy of instinct, and nearly with the directness of a bird.
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
The red tide now poured from all sides of the monster like brooks down a hill.
We marched comfortably along, through glades and over brooks which I could not remember to have seen before -- which puzzled me and made me wonder -- and yet we did not come to any circus or sign of a circus.
and I only see two white spots on the whole range of moors: the sky is blue, and the larks are singing, and the becks and brooks are all brim full.
I was quite relieved to find that it was only Brooks of Sheffield; for, at first, I really thought it was I.
Their observations inform us that Abyssinia, where the Nile rises and waters vast tracts of land, is full of mountains, and in its natural situation much higher than Egypt; that all the winter, from June to September, no day is without rain; that the Nile receives in its course all the rivers, brooks, and torrents which fall from those mountains; these necessarily swell it above the banks, and fill the plains of Egypt with the inundation.
The clear streams and running brooks yielded their savoury limpid waters in noble abundance.
They form, as it were, a great bed of mountains, about eighty miles in length, and from twenty to thirty in breadth; with rugged peaks, covered with eternal snows, and deep, narrow valleys full of springs, and brooks, and rock-bound lakes.
From the vague accounts we sometimes have of their beauty, many people are apt to picture to themselves enamelled and softly swelling plains, shaded over with delicious groves, and watered by purling brooks, and the entire country but little elevated above the surrounding ocean.
The sun is sometimes obscured for weeks, the brooks swell into roaring torrents, and the country is threatened with a deluge.
She caused fowls to be slain; she sent for vegetables, and the sober, slow- thinking gardener, nigh as old as she, sweated for it; she took spices, and milk, and onion, with little fish from the brooks - anon limes for sherbets, fat quails from the pits, then chicken-livers upon a skewer, with sliced ginger between.