Brownist


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Brownist

(ˈbraʊnɪst)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who supported the principles of church government advocated by Robert Browne and adopted in modified form by the Independents or Congregationalists
[C16: named after Robert Browne (?1550–1633), English Puritan]
ˈBrownism n
References in classic literature ?
They were sometimes called Separatists because they separated themselves from the church of England, sometimes Brownists after the name of one of their eminent ministers.
88) Having observed Neal's opinion of English Baptists in The History of the Puritans, it is surprising that he failed to identify Williams (whom he regarded as a "rigid Brownist, precise, uncharitable, and of such turbulent and boisterous Passions, as had like to have put the whole Country to Flame") as a Baptist.
56) Smyth's journey from England to Holland, and his religious pilgrimage from the Church of England to Puritanism, to Brownist Separatism, and then finally to Anabaptism, is a colorful story in religious history.
Lawrence and install a Brownist colony--a not inconsequential tidbit, given that Nicholls tells us Brownists, a breakaway congregational sect of the Church of England, were part of Lord Ochiltree's Cape Breton colony in 1629.
The comprehension and toleration bills, introduced into the House of Lords in the early months of 1689, were based on the long-held Latitudinarian notion that there were two types of Dissenters--"moderate" in the Puritan tradition and "separatist" in the Brownist tradition--and that two distinct and different policies, comprehension and toleration, ought to be applied to each respectively.
8) His departure, however, did not shield Joan from scrutiny by the British officials for she was soon arrested and imprisoned in York, accused of being a Brownist and charged with refusing to take an oath of loyalty to the Church of England.
A measure of stability provided by the long incumbency of the Jacobean bishop, John Jegon, was undercut by a seemingly ineradicable tradition of separatism and dissent, stemming from the Brownist movement of the 1580s.
Sprunger, "The Meeting of Dutch Anabaptists and English Brownists, Reported by P.
He founded a religious movement called the Brownists, with communities in Norwich and the Netherlands.
The Engagement Between the King and the Scots (1647), for example, called for the suppression of all "Anti-Trinitarians, Anabaptists, Antinomians, Arminians, Familists, Brownists, Separatists, Independents, Libertines, and Seekers," as well as "all blasphemy, heresy, schism, and all such scandalous doctrines and practices as are contrary to the light of nature, or to the known principles of Christianity.
Towns have been understudied in the historiography of the English Reformation, a fact which is all the more remarkable in view of the traditional association of urban culture with the more advanced forms of religious dissent from the Lollards to the Brownists.
27) While both Brownists and Helwys criticized the Anglican Church, the Baptist leader also rejected the Brownists, who retained infant baptism.