Brumaire


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Brumaire

(brymɛr)
n
(Historical Terms) the month of mist: the second month of the French revolutionary calendar, extending from Oct 23 to Nov 21
[C19: from brume mist, from Latin brūma winter; see brume]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brumaire - second month of the Revolutionary calendar (October and November); the month of mist
Revolutionary calendar - the calendar adopted by the first French Republic in 1793 and abandoned in 1805; dates were calculated from Sept. 22, 1792
Revolutionary calendar month - a month in the Revolutionary calendar
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1852, Karl Marx published an essay, "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte," which begins with a reference to another great figure from the past.
Streeck is drawing here on Marx's The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, in which he argues that figures such as Bonaparte arise when there is a stalemate between the main opposing forces in society.
We should resist the temptation to over-interpret Trump's election as an American Eighteenth Brumaire or 1933.
In this and many other respects, Thompson owed a clear debt to Karl Marx, most particularly to Marx's insistence, in his 1852 essay "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte," that "[m]en make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly found, given and transmitted from the past" (89).
the analysis of Marx's The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon, which began in Metahistory).
Commending the grubbing of the revolutionary old mole in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, Karl Marx tacitly promotes an art of dirt alongside a practice of the dig.
L'ouvrage interroge, << dans sa globalite, de maniere non systematique, mais synthetique >> (9), un corpus d'environ deux cents titres francais, illustres ou obscurs, consacres a la periode allant de la prise de la Bastille au 18 Brumaire, depuis les recits << a chaud >> de l'emigration jusqu'au Dieux ont soif d'Anatole France, a la veille de la Grande Guerre.
Adjusted from Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, 1852.
I am referring to a passage from "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte:"
Things don't simply end; they recur, first as tragedy, as Marx famously quips in The Eighteenth Brumaire, then as farce.
As Marx had argued already in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (1852), the bourgeoisie was content to sacrifice its social values of Liberte, egalite, fraternal in order to maintain its economic control, and soon enough, as Adorno once remarked, capitalism became its own ideology: No need to inculcate political beliefs when one has glamorous commodities to offer.
Je relis Les Luttes de classes en France et Le 18 Brumaire de Louis Bonaparte avec une admiration et meme une allegresse sans melange.