Bruno


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Related to Bruno: Giordano Bruno

Bru·no

 (bro͞o′nō), Giordano 1548?-1600.
Italian philosopher who used Copernican principles in formulating his cosmic theory of an infinite universe. Condemned by the Inquisition for heresy, immoral conduct, and blasphemy, he was burned at the stake.

Bruno

(ˈbruːnəʊ)
n
1. (Biography) Franklin Roy, known as Frank. born 1961, British heavyweight boxer
2. (Biography) Giordano (dʒorˈdano). 1548–1600, Italian philosopher, who developed a pantheistic monistic philosophy: he was burnt at the stake for heresy

Bru•no

(ˈbru noʊ)

n.
1. Giordano, 1548?–1600, Italian philosopher.
2. Saint, c1030–1101, German founder of the Carthusian order.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bruno - German pope from 1049 to 1054 whose papacy was the beginning of papal reforms in the 11th century (1002-1054)
2.Bruno - (Roman Catholic Church) a French cleric (born in Germany) who founded the Carthusian order in 1084 (1032-1101)Bruno - (Roman Catholic Church) a French cleric (born in Germany) who founded the Carthusian order in 1084 (1032-1101)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
3.Bruno - Italian philosopher who used Copernican principles to develop a pantheistic monistic philosophy; condemned for heresy by the Inquisition and burned at the stake (1548-1600)
References in classic literature ?
However it was only Bruno, and the Chancellor gave a little gasp of relieved anxiety.
But the bow was lost upon Bruno, who had run out of the room, even while the great feat of The Unpronounceable Monosyllable was being triumphantly performed.
The rest of their conversation was all in whispers: so, as I could hear no more, I thought I would go and find Bruno.
Thither Bruno trotted, and I thought it well to follow him.
She looked four or five years older than Bruno, but she had the same rosy cheeks and sparkling eyes, and the same wealth of curly brown hair.
Here Bruno climbed upon his other knee, and a good deal of kissing, on a rather complicated system, was the result.
In company with her male colleague, the great American actor, Isidore Bruno, she was producing a particularly poetical and fantastic interpretation of Midsummer Night's Dream: in which the artistic prominence was given to Oberon and Titania, or in other words to Bruno and herself.
Nearly six-foot-six, and of more than theatrical thews and muscles, Isidore Bruno, in the gorgeous leopard skin and golden-brown garments of Oberon, looked like a barbaric god.
Bruno, the big actor, was so babyish that it was easy to send him off in brute sulks, banging the door.
The first object of her diplomacy, the exit of the enraged Bruno, was at once achieved.
Father Brown seemed quite unconscious of this cloud of witnesses, but followed Parkinson with an idly attentive eye till he took himself and his absurd spear into the farther room of Bruno.
And before the others could appreciate his intention he snatched up the dagger, sprang at the other door at the lower end of the passage, burst it open, bolt and all, and confronted Bruno in his dressing-room.