Brutalism

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Bru·tal·ism

 (bro͞ot′l-ĭz′əm)
n.
An architectural style of the mid-20th century characterized by massive or monolithic forms, usually of poured concrete and unrelieved by exterior decoration.

Bru′tal·ist adj. & n.

brutalism

(ˈbruːtəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Architecture) an austere style of architecture characterized by emphasis on such structural materials as undressed concrete and unconcealed service pipes. Also called: new brutalism
ˈbrutalist n, adj

Brutalism

an aggressive 20th-century style, usually in rough-textured and unfinished materials, that frankly exhibits both structural and mechanical systems.
See also: Architecture
Translations

brutalism

n (Archit) → Brutalismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Herbert Fitzroy Robinson was a prolific architect who collaborated with Sir Basil Spence in the design of a number of Modernist and Brutalist buildings of note.
It's the sprawling, half-empty New Brutalist folly that spawned a thousand metaphors.
Around it, several mightily-impressive concrete chewers have been hard at work tearing into the last remains of John Madin's Brutalist empire in central Birmingham.
Robin Hood Gardens, a Seventies east London concrete block, is famous for its Brutalist style of architecture.
Then the Britannia Hotel came out, and it's probably the most brutalist building in Britain.
ch/brutalist-architecture/) Brutalist architecture   -derived from the French term, "beton brut," meaning "raw concrete.
But many medieval buildings remain intact and the brutalist architectural period that followed is equally fascinating.
While the original brutalist approach takes center stage across walls and columns, its rawness is contrasted with elegant black-and-white Rosso Levanto marble, which marks passage to the more intimate areas.
Whether you love it or loathe it, one man's fascination with the brutalist architecture of his childhood in Teesside has made him the toast of the art scene.
There is a sense of ambiguous monumentality to Brutalist architecture--for example, structures such as Le Corbusier's Unite d'Habitation (Housing Unit), known as "the radiant city," completed in Marseilles in 1952 and described by the architect as "the first manifestation of an environment suited to modern life.
The structure was well known for its brutalist design and its role in Get Carter, and whilst we and local people are ready to move on and see a modern development in its place, we are happy to be able to help mark its place in Gateshead's history'.