Buckingham


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Related to Buckingham: Duke of Buckingham

Buckingham

(ˈbʌkɪŋəm)
n
(Placename) a town in S central England, in Buckinghamshire; university (1975). Pop: 12 512 (2001)

Buckingham

(ˈbʌkɪŋəm)
n
1. (Biography) George Villiers, 1st Duke of. 1592–1628, English courtier and statesman; favourite of James I and Charles I: his arrogance, military incompetence, and greed increased the tensions between the King and Parliament that eventually led to the Civil War
2. (Biography) his son, George Villiers, 2nd Duke of. 1628–87, English courtier and writer; chief minister of Charles II and member of the Cabal (1667–73)

Buck•ing•ham

(ˈbʌk ɪŋ əm, -ˌhæm)

n.
1. George Villiers, 1st Duke of, 1592–1628, English lord high admiral 1617.
2. his son, George Villiers, 2nd Duke of, 1628–87, English courtier and author.
References in classic literature ?
He'd be at home in Buckingham Palace or at the bottom of a coal mine," he said.
With this brief introduction, she produced from her pocket an advertisement, carefully cut out of a newspaper, setting forth that in Buckingham Street in the Adelphi there was to be let furnished, with a view of the river, a singularly desirable, and compact set of chambers, forming a genteel residence for a young gentleman, a member of one of the Inns of Court, or otherwise, with immediate possession.
They say that Monsieur de Buckingham is in France," replied Aramis, with a significant smile which gave to this sentence, apparently so simple, a tolerably scandalous meaning.
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
Ah, madam," said Buckingham, "we are very unfortunate
Because, madam," replied Buckingham, piqued, "because the faithful Parry, the wandering Parry, the eternal Parry, is not, I believe, of much consequence.
Silk Buckingham, I fancy, will scarcely be so bold as to deny that he made his way, upon all fours, under the table.
Barnes in the pantomime, in the second place, it sneezed; in the third, it sat upon end; in the fourth, it shook its fist in Doctor Ponnonner's face; in the fifth, turning to Messieurs Gliddon and Buckingham, it addressed them, in very capital Egyptian, thus:
SOME hours later fifty men followed Norman of Torn on foot through the ravine below the castle where John de Fulm, Earl of Buckingham, had his headquarters; while nearly a thousand more lurked in the woods before the grim pile.
As they were going into camp that night in Kent, midway between London and Rochester, word came to Norman of Torn that the Earl of Buckingham, having sent his escort on to Dover, had stopped to visit the wife of a royalist baron, whose husband was with Prince Edward's forces.
And who is Buckingham," I asked, "and why should he wish to kill me?
For a moment, then, she seemed lost in thought, but presently she turned upon me with: "You must go now, for any minute Buckingham may come in search of me.