Bucks


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buck 1

 (bŭk)
n.
1.
a. A male deer.
b. The male of various other mammals, such as antelopes, kangaroos, mice, or rabbits.
c. Antelope considered as a group: a herd of buck.
2.
a. A robust or high-spirited young man.
b. A fop.
3. Offensive A Native American or black man.
4. An act or instance of bucking: a horse that unseated its rider on the first buck.
5.
a. Buckskin.
b. bucks Buckskin breeches or shoes.
v. bucked, buck·ing, bucks
v.intr.
1. To leap upward arching the back: The horse bucked in fright.
2. To charge with the head lowered; butt.
3. To make sudden jerky movements; jolt: The motor bucked and lurched before it finally ran smoothly.
4. To resist stubbornly and obstinately; balk.
5. Informal To strive with determination: bucking for a promotion.
v.tr.
1. To throw or toss by bucking: buck off a rider; bucked the packsaddle off its back.
2. To oppose directly and stubbornly; go against: "Los Angeles County, the most populous county in the country, is bucking the trend" (American Demographics).
3. Football To charge into (an opponent's line) carrying the ball.
4. To butt against with the head.
adj.
Of the lowest rank in a specified military category: a buck private; a buck sergeant.
Phrasal Verb:
buck up
To summon one's courage or spirits; hearten: My friends tried to buck me up after I lost the contest.

[Middle English bukke, from Old English buc, male deer, and bucca, male goat.]

buck′er n.

buck 2

 (bŭk)
n.
1. A sawhorse or sawbuck.
2. A leather-covered frame used for gymnastic vaulting.

[Alteration (influenced by buck) of Dutch bok, male goat, trestle, from Middle Dutch boc.]

buck 3

 (bŭk)
n.
1. Informal A dollar.
2. Informal An amount of money: working overtime to make an extra buck.
3. Slang
a. A large round amount of currency, especially a hundred dollars.
b. A hundred of some other units, especially miles per hour or pounds: was doing a buck twenty out on the Interstate; a boxer weighing in at a buck fifty.

[Short for buckskin (from its use in trade).]

buck 4

 (bŭk)
n.
1. Games A counter or marker formerly passed from one poker player to another to indicate an obligation, especially one's turn to deal.
2. Informal Obligation to account for something; responsibility: tried to pass the buck for the failure to his boss.
tr.v. bucked, buck·ing, bucks Informal
To pass (a task or duty) to another, especially so as to avoid responsibility: "We will see the stifling of initiative and the increased bucking of decisions to the top" (Winston Lord).
Idiom:
the buck stops here Informal
The ultimate responsibility rests here.

[Short for buckhorn knife (from its use as a marker in poker).]

Bucks

(bʌks)
abbreviation for
(Placename) Buckinghamshire

Buck•ing•ham•shire

(ˈbʌk ɪŋ əmˌʃɪər, -ʃər)

n.
a county in S England. 640,200; 294 sq. mi. (761 sq. km). Also called Buckingham, Bucks.
Translations

Bucks

[ˈbʌks] abbr (British) (=Buckinghamshire)buck's fizz [ˌbʌksˈfɪz] nmimosa m (cocktail à base de champagne et de jus d'orange)
References in classic literature ?
To move down so cunningly that never a leaf stirred; to wade knee-deep in the roaring shallows that drown all noise from behind; to drink, looking backward over one shoulder, every muscle ready for the first desperate bound of keen terror; to roll on the sandy margin, and return, wet-muzzled and well plumped out, to the admiring herd, was a thing that all tall-antlered young bucks took a delight in, precisely because they knew that at any moment Bagheera or Shere Khan might leap upon them and bear them down.
Yet upon a night there was a dispute between two bucks--a grazing-quarrel such as ye now settle with the horns and the fore-feet--and it is said that as the two spoke together before the First of the First of the Tigers lying among the flowers, a buck pushed him with his horns, and the First of the Tigers forgot that he was the master and judge of the Jungle, and, leaping upon that buck, broke his neck.
The casket of the skull is broken into with an axe, and the two plump, whitish lobes being withdrawn (precisely resembling two large puddings), they are then mixed with flour, and cooked into a most delectable mess, in flavor somewhat resembling calves' head, which is quite a dish among some epicures; and every one knows that some young bucks among the epicures, by continually dining upon calves' brains, by and by get to have a little brains of their own, so as to be able to tell a calf's head from their own heads; which, indeed, requires uncommon discrimination.
I afterwards discovered that the natives of that wonderful country call these bucks "/inco/.
Bernard, had been the Judge's inseparable companion, and Buck bid fair to follow in the way of his father.
Betsy" (this was a nigger woman), you fly around and get him something to eat as quick as you can, poor thing; and one of you girls go and wake up Buck and tell him -- oh, here he is himself.
After throwing aside the thick mittens which had encased his hands, there now appeared a pair of leather gloves tipped with fur; he examined his priming, and was about to move forward, when the light bounding noise of an animal plunging through the woods was heard, and a fine buck darted into the path a short distance ahead of him.
But Barney, taken by surprise, arched his back in the first buck he had ever made.
Because, my child," replied the Buck, "my temper is so uncertain that if I permit one of those noisy creatures to come into my presence I am likely to forget myself and do him an injury.
He was a ragged, half-naked Indian hunter, armed with bow and arrows, and had the carcass of a fine buck thrown across his shoulder.
Chris called out, and the next moment the mare was rising under him in a second buck.
Buck says I ought to eat all I can to keep my strength up, even if I ain't got any appetite," she said in her flat whine, reaching across Mattie for the teapot.

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