fullerene

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ful·ler·ene

 (fo͝ol′ə-rēn′)
n.
An allotrope of carbon composed of any of various cagelike molecules that consist only of an even number of carbon atoms, are often spherical in shape, and are composed of hexagonal and pentagonal groups of atoms.

[After Richard Buckminster Fuller (from the resemblance of their configurations to his geodesic domes) + -ene.]

fullerene

(ˈfʊləˌriːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any of various carbon molecules with a polyhedral structure similar to that of buckminsterfullerene, such as C70, C76, and C84. See also buckminsterfullerene

ful•ler•ene

(ˈfʊl əˌrin)
n.
any of a class of large carbon molecules consisting of a roughly spherical shell.
[1985–90; after R. Buckminster Fuller]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
buckminsterfullerene, buckyball - a spheroidal fullerene; the first known example of a fullerene
carbon nanotube, nanotube - a fullerene molecule having a cylindrical or toroidal shape
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
Translations
fullereeni
fullerène
References in periodicals archive ?
Cold as the new temperature may sound, it is warm enough for the bucky ball superconductors to function while cooled by liquid nitrogen instead of the much more expensive liquid helium.
The discovery could be a serious set back for the bucky ball - dubbed The World's Most Beautiful Molecule.
is negotiating to acquire focuses on using bucky balls as a method of storing hydrogen to create better batteries and/or fuel cells.
In the universe of nanotubes and bucky balls, the smaller the view, the broader the vision.
Scientists from Lucent Technologies' (NYSE:LU) Bell Labs have shown that soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules known as bucky balls can act as superconductors at relatively warm temperatures, raising hopes for inexpensive, power loss-free organic electronics and other practical applications such as quantum computers.