bullying

(redirected from Bullying in schools)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bul·ly 1

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n. pl. bul·lies
1. A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.
2. A hired ruffian; a thug.
3. A pimp.
4. Archaic A fine person.
5. Archaic A sweetheart.
v. bul·lied, bul·ly·ing, bul·lies
v.tr.
1. To treat in an overbearing or intimidating manner. See Synonyms at intimidate.
2. To make (one's way) aggressively.
v.intr.
1. To behave like a bully.
2. To force one's way aggressively or by intimidation: "They bully into line at the gas pump" (Martin Gottfried).
adj.
Excellent; splendid: did a bully job of persuading the members.
interj.
Used to express approval: Bully for you!

[Possibly from Middle Dutch boele, sweetheart, probably alteration of broeder, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

bul·ly 2

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n.
Canned or pickled beef. Also called bully beef.

[Perhaps French bouilli, boiled meat, label on canned beef, from past participle of bouillir, to boil, from Old French boilir; see boil1.]

bullying

(ˈbʊlɪɪŋ)
n
the intimidation of weaker people
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do somethingbullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do something
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
frightening, terrorisation, terrorization - the act of inspiring with fear
Adj.1.bullying - noisily domineering; tending to browbeat others
domineering - tending to domineer
Translations

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
A. ADJ [person] → matón, valentón; [attitude] → amedrentador, propio de matón
B. Nintimidación f, abuso m

bullying

[ˈbʊliɪŋ] nbrimades fplbullying tactics nmanœuvres fpl d'intimidation

bullying

adj person, mannertyrannisch; boss, wife alsoherrisch
nTyrannisieren nt, → Schikanieren nt; (with violence) → Drangsalieren nt; (= coercion)Anwendung fvon Druck (→ of auf +acc)

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
1. nprepotenze fpl
2. adj (person, tone, behaviour) → prepotente

bullying

n acoso, intimidación f, hostigamiento
References in periodicals archive ?
The following research question was addressed: Is knowledge of bullying in schools improved in school nurses and CNAs/HTs after participation in a bullying educational program?
To further tackle this, the government has announced a Au2 million fund for projects to address homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying in schools.
And yes, bullying in schools is a reality, for which severe action is required.
CHILDREN'S Commissioner Maggie Atkinson returns to Gateshead next month to speak at a conference that aims to put an end to homophobic bullying in schools.
The book not only outlines what is causing the increase in aggression and bullying in schools, but also proposes a means to fix this problem by improving student and teacher relationships.
Deval Patrick signed into law "An Act Relative to Bullying in Schools.
Because of the brevity of this Article, I will focus primarily upon weaknesses that legislatures should address and will not discuss the strengths that can be found in a few legislative efforts to deal with bullying in schools.
Could it be said that bullying in schools determine dropout from school among adolescents in Delta?
Together these factors have placed increased pressure on governments and school systems for solutions to more effectively prevent or reduce bullying in schools.
Bullying in schools across the world is beginning to assume a serious dimension.
Only around one in three (59%) of Liverpool young people experiencing homophobic bullying in schools said staff had been aware of it.