bunk bed

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bunk bed

n.
Either of a pair of narrow beds stacked one on top of the other.

bunk bed

n
(Furniture) one of a pair of beds constructed one above the other

bunk′ bed`


n.
either of two platformlike single beds connected one above the other.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunk bed - beds built one above the otherbunk bed - beds built one above the other  
bed - a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep; "he sat on the edge of the bed"; "the room had only a bed and chair"
Translations
pograd
References in periodicals archive ?
We slept in a deluxe family room but the hotel also features its own Thomas-themed suites where children can slumber in rail-shed bunkbeds, train track rugs cover the carpet, and murals of the famous engine and his chums adorn the walls.
Up to four people can stay in the tree house, in one double bedroom and a communal sleeping area with single bunkbeds.
After a very comfortable sleep in our double bed - located above the cabin - my wife and I got the breakfast on while the kids chatted in their large bunkbeds, which were described as "really comfy and much bigger than a caravan" by my 12-year-old daughter Abi.
The Postman Pat-themed room where Gemma and her daughter stayed BELOW: The bunkbeds in the children's sleeping area
TURN TO PAGE 26 Each suite has a separate section for the kids, and ours had bunkbeds with their own little nightlights and a sweet message about night time on the wall that you could just imagine Derek Jacobi saying in the programme.
Conditions are bleak, described as "prison-like" by critics who point to windowless rooms with bunkbeds and outdoor steel cages where immigrants are typically only allowed a single hour of natural sunlight.
Air-conditioned cabins are the norm at Camp Wesley Pines, with each cabin sleeping 16 campers in bunkbeds.
In an interview Wednesday, NBP Superintendent Richard Schwarzkopf said the metal boxes would be cheaper to set up than concrete structures and could fit bunkbeds for eight inmates each.
It houses bunkbeds, charts, reporting equipment, a radio, phone and scientific gauges to measure radioactive levels above.
Ultimately, the city is focusing on the biggest offenders of illegal hotel use, like David Jaffee, a socialite who turned several apartments into illegal hotels, in some cases packing 20 bunkbeds into two-bedroom apartments and charging $35 a night.
When the prison was built they had one bed in each cell and some were replaced with bunkbeds.