Nyoro

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Nyoro

(ˈnjɔːrəʊ)
npl -ro or -ros
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of W Uganda
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kingdoms that had been historically antagonistic to one another such as Buganda and Bunyoro in Uganda were linked into the same colony.
The President stated that, This was part of the greater Bunyoro road which starts from Kyenjojo town through Kabwoya and Kigumba roads.
He said the meeting took place, not in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, but in Masindi, a town which is 200km north-west of Kampala in Bunyoro region.
Landlocked and home to the source of the Nile river, with a temperate humid climate and rich soil, Uganda grows tea in six main tea regions: in the West close to the Congo border, around Fort Portal on the slopes of the legendary Rwenzori Mountains, in the South around Ankole and Kigezi, on Lake Victoria Crescent around Toro, Mitanya and Masaka, and near the shores of Lake Albert in Hoima, Bunyoro.
The kingdom of Tooro had seceded from Bunyoro in the 1830s and had allied with Buganda in the 1890s to maintain its independence from Bunyoro.
The park is located in the northern region of the Albertine Rift Valley, an area where the huge Bunyoro escarpment joins together into the vast Acholi plains.
Similar tensions have come to the tore in Bunyoro Region in neighbouring Uganda, where oil has already been discovered.
During the 18th and 19th centuries, the mineral played an important part in the economy of the Bunyoro Kitara kingdom, attracting traders from what are now Congo, Rwanda, Sudan and Tanzania.
Ethnic groups: Baganda, Banyankole, Bahima, Bakiga, Banyarwanda, Bunyoro, Batoro, Langi, Acholi, Lugbara, Karamojong, Basoga, Bagisu, and others.
The largest park in Uganda, it straddles the Albertine Rift Valley the Bunyoro escarpment and the rolling plains of Acholiland.
THE SOURCE: "The Child of Death': Personal Names and Parental Attitudes Towards Mortality in Bunyoro, Western Uganda, 1900-2005" by Shane Doyle, in Journal a/African History, Nov.