buoyancy

(redirected from Buoyant force)
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buoy·an·cy

 (boi′ən-sē, bo͞o′yən-)
n.
1.
a. The tendency or capacity to remain afloat in a liquid or rise in air or gas.
b. The upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense than itself.
2. Ability to recover quickly from setbacks; resilience.
3. Lightness of spirit; cheerfulness.

buoyancy

(ˈbɔɪənsɪ)
n
1. the ability to float in a liquid or to rise in a fluid
2. (General Physics) the property of a fluid to exert an upward force (upthrust) on a body that is wholly or partly submerged in it
3. the ability to recover quickly after setbacks; resilience
4. cheerfulness

buoy•an•cy

(ˈbɔɪ ən si, ˈbu yən si)

also buoy′ance,



n.
1. the power to float or rise in a fluid; relative lightness.
2. the power of supporting a body so that it floats; upward pressure exerted by the fluid in which a body is immersed.
3. lightness of spirit.
[1705–15]

buoy·an·cy

(boi′ən-sē)
The upward force that a fluid exerts on an object that is less dense than itself. Buoyancy allows a boat to float on water.

buoyancy

The upthrust (upward force) on a body placed in a fluid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buoyancy - cheerfulness that bubbles to the surface
blitheness, cheerfulness - a feeling of spontaneous good spirits; "his cheerfulness made everyone feel better"
2.buoyancy - the property of something weightless and insubstantialbuoyancy - the property of something weightless and insubstantial
weightlessness, lightness - the property of being comparatively small in weight; "the lightness of balsa wood"
3.buoyancy - the tendency to float in water or other liquid
tendency, inclination - a characteristic likelihood of or natural disposition toward a certain condition or character or effect; "the alkaline inclination of the local waters"; "fabric with a tendency to shrink"
4.buoyancy - irrepressible liveliness and good spirit; "I admired his buoyancy and persistent good humor"
sprightliness, liveliness, spirit, life - animation and energy in action or expression; "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it"

buoyancy

noun
1. floatability, lightness, weightlessness Air can be pumped into the diving suit to increase buoyancy.
2. cheerfulness, bounce (informal), pep, animation, good humour, high spirits, zing (informal), liveliness, spiritedness, cheeriness, sunniness a mood of buoyancy and optimism
3. expansion, development, strength, mushrooming, economic growth The slump will be followed by a period of buoyancy.

buoyancy

noun
The ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement:
Translations
طَفَوِيَّه: قابِلِيَّةُ الطَّفو
schopnost ploutvznosnostvztlak
opdriftflydeevne
noste
felhajtóerõ
flothæfni
opwaartse kracht
schopnosť plávaťvztlak
yüzebilme

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsɪ] N
1. (Phys) [of ship, object] → capacidad f para flotar, flotabilidad f; [of liquid] → sustentación f hidraúlica (Aer) → fuerza f ascensional
2. (fig) → optimismo m
3. (Fin) [of market, prices] → tendencia f al alza

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsi] n
[ship] → flottabilité f
[mood] → entrain m
[market] → fermeté f

buoyancy

n
(of ship, object)Schwimmfähigkeit f; (of liquid)Auftrieb m; buoyancy aidSchwimmhilfe f; (for canoeing) → Kajakweste f
(fig: = cheerfulness) → Schwung m, → Elan m
(Fin: of market, prices) → Festigkeit f; (= resilience)Erholungsfähigkeit f

buoyancy

[ˈbɔɪənsɪ] n (Phys) → galleggiamento; (of ship, object) → galleggiabilità (fig) (of person) → ottimismo

buoy

(boi) , ((American) ˈbu:i) noun
a floating anchored mark, acting as a guide, warning or mooring point for boats.

see also lifebuoy.
ˈbuoyancy noun
the ability to float on water or in the air. the buoyancy of a balloon.
ˈbuoyant adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
They also have large claws on their feet, which allow them to crawl on underwater rocks while resisting the naturally buoyant force of the bubble.
With our representative sample we assessed their ability to pass one another in restricted width settings or to exit helicopter windows, to assess buoyant force in survival suits, and have also identified 11 physique clusters which typify the workers.
d], and a buoyant force due to the density of the surrounding air [F.
The more water a pumpkin displaces, or pushes out of the way, the greater the buoyant force pushing up on it will be.
The agricultural sector at present constitutes 21% in GDP and AMD will act as a buoyant force to bring it at desirable level giving answer to various irking questions.
At low wind speeds, where buoyant force dominates and tether tensions are low, this range is particularly small and is given by:
With oil imports dropping and China warning of a "grim" trade outlook, the world's second-biggest oil consumer may not be the buoyant force it has been for oil markets in the past decade.
The denser air pushes the less-dense helium aside, producing an upward force called a buoyant force.
The buoyant force in the radial direction (driven by the high value of [g.
In this study, geometrical properties such as linear dimensions, sphericity, mass of fruit, projected area, surface area, true density, volume, hydrodynamic properties in water namely terminal velocity, drag force and buoyant force and bruising characteristics like as bruise area and bruise volume of two varieties of table olive fruit were determined.
In water, all objects experience an upward buoyant force equal to the weight of the water they displace.
The rest of the answer is also correct but they have not demonstrated that they understand that the buoyant force is equal and opposite to the weight of the water displaced.