burgher

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burgh·er

 (bûr′gər)
n.
1. A citizen of a town or borough.
2. A comfortable or complacent member of the middle class.
3.
a. A member of the mercantile class of a medieval European city.
b. A citizen of a medieval European city.

[German Bürger or Dutch burger, both from Middle High German burgaere, from Old High German burgārī, from burg, city; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burgher

(ˈbɜːɡə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the trading or mercantile class of a medieval city
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a respectable citizen; bourgeois
3. (Historical Terms) archaic a citizen or inhabitant of a corporate town, esp on the Continent
4. (Historical Terms) history
a. a citizen of the Cape Colony or of one of the Transvaal and Free State republics
b. (as modifier): burgher troops.
[C16: from German Bürger, or Dutch burger freeman of a borough]

burgh•er

(ˈbɜr gər)

n.
an inhabitant of a town or borough, esp. a well-to-do member of the middle class.
[1560–70; < Middle Dutch < Middle High German burger=burg borough + -er -er1]
burgh′er•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burgher - a citizen of an English borough
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
2.burgher - a member of the middle class
bourgeoisie, middle class - the social class between the lower and upper classes
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
petit bourgeois - a member of the lower middle class
Translations

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] N (archaic or liter) (= bourgeois) → burgués/esa m/f; (= citizen) → ciudadano/a m/f

burgher

[ˈbɜːrr] n (old-fashioned)citoyen(ne) m/f

burgher

n (old)Bürger(in) m(f)

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] ncittadino/a
References in classic literature ?
Gayer sallies, more merry mirth, better jokes, and brighter repartees, you never heard over your mahogany, than you will hear over the half-inch white cedar of the whale-boat, when thus hung in hangman's nooses; and, like the six burghers of Calais before King Edward, the six men composing the crew pull into the jaws of death, with a halter around every neck, as you may say.
They were the voices of old burghers that I heard in the streets.
The lower and interior space was soon filled by substantial yeomen and burghers, and such of the lesser gentry, as, from modesty, poverty, or dubious title, durst not assume any higher place.
From the serfs of the Middle Ages sprang the chartered burghers of the earliest towns.
As the worthy burghers pondered on these things, they felt a terrible conviction of the uncertainty of existence, and each felt as if the ground on which he stood was rendered less stable by his awful example.
In short, the good burghers were fond of their sauer-kraut, but then they were proud of their clocks.
Pennifeather, and, in the end, it was arranged that a search should be instituted, carefully and very thoroughly, by the burghers en masse, "Old Charley" himself leading the way.
But he felt it to be a pity, as regards a possible acquaintance with her, that her parents should be heavy little burghers, that her brother should not correspond to his conception of a young man of the upper class, and that her sister should be a Daisy Miller en herbe.
The green lea was speckled as thickly with them as a canvas by Van Alsloot or Sallaert with burghers.
So vicious was his onslaught that the poorly armed and unprotected burghers, unused to the stern game of war, fell like sheep before the iron men on their iron shod horses.
And was not this a sweet triumph for the burghers of the Hague, whose envy even beat that of the common rabble; a triumph in which every honest citizen and townsman might be expected to share?
The room had some resemblance to the clay-floored halls in Holstein; a pretty numerous company, consisting of seamen, Copenhagen burghers, and a few scholars, sat here in deep converse over their pewter cans, and gave little heed to the person who entered.