Burns


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

burn 1

 (bûrn)
v. burned or burnt (bûrnt), burn·ing, burns
v.intr.
1. To undergo combustion or be consumed as fuel: The dry wood burned quickly.
2. To be damaged, injured, or destroyed by fire, heat, radiation, electricity, or a caustic agent: a house that burned to the ground; eggs that burned and stuck to the pan.
3. To consume fuel: a rocket stage designed to burn for three minutes before being jettisoned.
4.
a. To emit heat or light by fire or energy: campfires burning in the dark; lights burning in the windows.
b. To become dissipated or be dispelled: The fog burned off as the sun came up. Their anger burned away in time.
5.
a. To suffer death or punishment by fire: souls burning in hell.
b. To be electrocuted.
6.
a. To be very hot; bake: a desert burning under the midday sun.
b. To feel or look hot: a child burning with fever.
c. To impart a sensation of heat: a liniment that burns when first applied.
7.
a. To penetrate something by intense heat, energy, or caustic effect: The acid burned into the table.
b. To cause a strong impression, especially by emotional intensity: a look that burned into them; shame burning into my heart.
8.
a. To become irritated or painful, as by chafing or inflammation: eyes burning from the smoke.
b. To become sunburned or windburned.
9. To be consumed with strong emotion, especially:
a. To be or become angry: an insult that really made me burn.
b. To be very eager: was burning with ambition.
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to undergo combustion, especially to the point of destruction: We burned the scrap wood in the fireplace.
b. To consume (fuel or energy, for example): burned all the wood that winter.
2.
a. To use as a fuel: a furnace that burns coal.
b. To metabolize (glucose, for example) in the body.
3. To damage or injure by fire, heat, radiation, electricity, or a caustic agent: burned the toast; burned my skin with the acid.
4.
a. To make or produce by fire or heat: burn a hole in the rug.
b. To dispel or dissipate, as by heat: The sun burned off the fog. Resentments that burned away their tender feelings.
5.
a. To execute or kill with fire: burning heretics at the stake.
b. To execute by electrocution.
6.
a. To irritate or inflame, as by chafing or sunburn.
b. To impart a sensation of intense heat to: The chili burned my mouth.
c. To make angry: What really burns me is his arrogance.
7. To brand (an animal).
8.
a. To engrave or make indelible by burning: burned his initials into the wood.
b. To cause to be felt or remembered because of emotional intensity: The image of the accident was burned into my memory.
9. To harden or impart a finish to by subjecting to intense heat; fire: burn clay pots in a kiln.
10.
a. To defeat in a contest, especially by a narrow margin.
b. Sports To outplay or score on (an opponent), especially through quick or deceptive movement.
c. To inflict harm or hardship on; hurt: "Huge loan losses have burned banks in recent years" (Christian Science Monitor).
d. To swindle or deceive; cheat: We really got burned on the used car we bought.
11.
a. To write data onto (an optical disc).
b. To write (data) onto an optical disc.
n.
1. An injury produced by fire, heat, radiation, electricity, or a caustic agent.
2. A burned place or area: a cigarette burn in the tablecloth.
3. An act, process, or result of burning: The fire settled down to a steady burn.
4. A sensation of intense heat, stinging pain, or irritation: a chili burn on the tongue; the burn of alcohol on an open wound.
5. A sunburn or windburn.
Phrasal Verbs:
burn out
1. To stop burning from lack of fuel: The campfire eventually burned out.
2. To wear out or make or become inoperative as a result of heat or friction: The short circuit burned out the fuse. The computer's motherboard burned out.
3. To make or become exhausted, especially as a result of long-term stress: "Hours are long, stress is high, and many recruits drop out or burn out" (Robert J. Samuelson).
4. To cause (someone) to have to evacuate an area or building because of fire: The shopkeeper was burned out by arsonists.
burn up
1. To make angry: Their rudeness really burns me up.
2. To travel over or through at high speed: drag racers burning up the track.
Idioms:
burn itself out
To stop burning from lack of fuel: The brush fire finally burned itself out.
burn (one's) bridges
To eliminate the possibility of return or retreat.
burn the/one's candle at both ends
To exhaust oneself or one's resources by leading a hectic or extravagant life.
burn the midnight oil
To work or study very late at night.
to burn
In great amounts: They had money to burn.

[Middle English burnen, from Old English beornan, to be on fire, and from bærnan, to set on fire; see gwher- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: burn1, scorch, singe, sear1, char1
These verbs mean to injure or alter by means of intense heat or flames. Burn, the most general, applies to the effects of exposure to a source of heat or to something that can produce a similar effect: burned the muffins in the oven; skin burned by the wind and sun. Scorch involves superficial burning that discolors or damages the texture of something: scorched the shirt with the iron. Singe specifies superficial burning and especially the removal of hair or feathers from a carcass before cooking: singed his finger lighting the match; plucked and singed the chicken before roasting it. Sear applies to rapid superficial burning using high heat: seared the meat in a hot skillet. To char is to reduce a substance to carbon or charcoal by partial burning: trees charred by the forest fire.

burn 2

 (bûrn)
n. Scots
A small stream; a brook.

[Middle English, from Old English burna; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

Burns

 (bûrnz), George Originally Nathan Birnbaum. 1896-1996.
American comedian and actor. From 1922 to 1958 he and Gracie Allen were a popular husband-and-wife comedy team. After her death he appeared in both comic and dramatic roles, winning an Academy Award for The Sunshine Boys (1975).

Burns

, Robert 1759-1796.
British poet whose songs and poems, written in English and Scots, celebrate love, patriotism, and rustic life.

Burns′i·an adj.

Burns

(bɜːnz)
n
(Biography) Robert. 1759–96, Scottish lyric poet. His verse, written mostly in dialect, includes love songs, nature poetry, and satires. Auld Lang Syne and Tam o' Shanter are among his best known poems

Burns

(bɜrnz)

n.
1. George (Nathan Birnbaum), 1896–1996, U.S. comedian (partner and husband of Gracie Allen).
2. Robert, 1759–96, Scottish poet.

burns

A burn is tissue damage and cell death caused by exposure of the skin to high temperatures, electricity, excessive sunlight, and certain chemicals. A first-degree burn damages only the epidermis. Second-degree burns damage both the epidermis and the top of the dermis. This can cause blisters to appear. Third-degree burns damage all of the skin’s layers and possibly underlying tissues as well. Severe burning can often be fatal as the body is made vulnerable to infection and fluid loss.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Burns - United States comedian and film actor (1896-1996)
2.burns - celebrated Scottish poet (1759-1796)Burns - celebrated Scottish poet (1759-1796)
References in classic literature ?
None of them, I presume, had ever read a page of my inditing, or would have cared a fig the more for me if they had read them all; nor would it have mended the matter, in the least, had those same unprofitable pages been written with a pen like that of Burns or of Chaucer, each of whom was a Custom-House officer in his day, as well as I.
Delight is to him, who gives no quarter in the truth, and kills, burns, and destroys all sin though he pluck it out from under the robes of Senators and Judges.
Like a plethoric burning martyr, or a self-consuming misanthrope, once ignited, the whale supplies his own fuel and burns by his own body.
I wish I could be good; but my heart burns, and can't be reconciled, anyhow.
O, horror, the Lightning has struck the Fish-basket; he sets him on Fire; see the Flame, how she licks the doomed Utensil with her red and angry Tongue; now she attacks the helpless Fishwife's Foot--she burns him up, all but the big Toe, and even SHE is partly consumed; and still she spreads, still she waves her fiery Tongues; she attacks the Fishwife's Leg and destroys IT; she attacks its Hand and destroys HER also; she attacks the Fishwife's Leg and destroys HER also; she attacks its Body and consumes HIM; she wreathes herself about its Heart and IT is consumed; next about its Breast, and in a Moment SHE is a Cinder; now she reaches its Neck--He goes; now its Chin-- IT goes; now its Nose--SHE goes.
When I returned to my seat, that lady was just delivering an order of which I did not catch the import; but Burns immediately left the class, and going into the small inner room where the books were kept, returned in half a minute, carrying in her hand a bundle of twigs tied together at one end.
The resolution to right that wrong burns in her like fire.
For I am very aged, the fire of my life sinks low--it burns in my brain alone; there it is still bright, but soon that will go out also, and then perhaps I shall understand.
Beyond this flood a frozen Continent Lies dark and wilde, beat with perpetual storms Of Whirlwind and dire Hail, which on firm land Thaws not, but gathers heap, and ruin seems Of ancient pile; all else deep snow and ice, A gulf profound as that SERBONIAN Bog Betwixt DAMIATA and mount CASIUS old, Where Armies whole have sunk: the parching Air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of Fire.
I might mimic a passion that I do not feel, but I cannot mimic one that burns me like fire.
He knew that he would suffer, for he recalled the faint memories of past burns.
While Goldsmith lay a-dying in London, in the breezy Scottish Lowlands a big rough lad of fifteen called Robert Burns was following his father's plow by day, poring over Shakespeare, the Spectator, and Pope's Homer, of nights, not knowing that in years to come he was to be remembered as our greatest song writer.