bushranging

bushranging

(ˈbʊʃˌreɪndʒə)
n
the life of a bushranger
References in classic literature ?
I had been born with lawless tendencies; from smuggling to bushranging was an easy transition, and about the latter there seemed to be a gallantry and romantic swagger which put it on the higher plane of the two.
She is particularly interested in online teaching and has published on enabling education and also nineteenth century bushranging in NSW.
In answer to John's question about why Ben took to bushranging, another key aspect of the film is fore-grounded.
The book looks at the causes of bushranging, such as the convict system and policies surrounding immigration and land settlement, and explains the family loyalties among gang members.
1906, Old Bush Songs: Composed and Sung in the Bushranging, Digging and Overlanding Days, Angus and Robertson, Sydney.
They rallied around Ben Hall who had been driven to bushranging through injustice.
87) This marks one of the earliest references to activities that came to be described collectively as bushranging.
Historical fiction, particularly Australian history, was popular in both Older and Younger Readers, with Jackie French contributing several excellent accounts as diverse as ancient Greece, Australia at the cusp of Federation, bushranging and Queen Victoria's underpants.
The pamphlet began in much the same way as OPQ's article by claiming that transportation was an effective punishment, but Humanitas quickly diverged from OPQ by arguing that an increase in severity of punishment would harden convicts to commit further crimes and lead to an increase in bushranging.
Susan West, Bushranging and the Policing of Rural Banditry in New South Wales, 1860-1880, Australian Scholarly Publishing, North Melbourne, 2009.
But the play is not without strong female characters: Desmoro's Australian fiancee Marguerite D'Auvergne, for example, is transformed from Winstanley's creature of delicate sensibilities who falls into a fatal decline under the exigencies of bushranging life into a woman capable of seeking a bushranger's hide-out, carrying and using a pistol, and capturing a murderer, eventually binding him and dragging him onto the stage for the final confrontation with Desmoro.
But writing about Panania in 1955 without mentioning Ray Fitzpatrick from nearby Milperra is as flawed as a history of Australian bushranging that omits Ned Kelly.