Byron


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By·ron

 (bī′rən), George Gordon Sixth Baron Byron. 1788-1824.
British poet acclaimed as one of the leading figures of the romantic movement. The "Byronic hero"—lonely, rebellious, and brooding—first appeared in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812-1818). Among his other works are Manfred (1817) and the epic satire Don Juan (1819-1824). He died while working to secure Greek independence from the Turks.

By·ron′ic (bī-rŏn′ĭk) adj.
By·ron′i·cal·ly adv.

Byron

(ˈbaɪərən)
n
(Biography) George Gordon, 6th Baron. 1788–1824, British Romantic poet, noted also for his passionate and disastrous love affairs. His major works include Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812–18), and Don Juan (1819–24). He spent much of his life abroad and died while fighting for Greek independence
Byronic adj
Byˈronically adv
ˈByronˌism n

By•ron

(ˈbaɪ rən)

n.
George Gordon, Lord (6th Baron Byron), 1788–1824, English poet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Byron - English romantic poet notorious for his rebellious and unconventional lifestyle (1788-1824)Byron - English romantic poet notorious for his rebellious and unconventional lifestyle (1788-1824)
References in classic literature ?
Hence Moore, Byron, Goethe, often speak words more wisely descriptive of the true religious sentiment, than another man, whose whole life is governed by it.
I had always had a deep and reverent compassion for the sufferings of the "prisoner of Chillon," whose story Byron had told in such moving verse; so I took the steamer and made pilgrimage to the dungeons of the Castle of Chillon, to see the place where poor Bonnivard endured his dreary captivity three hundred years ago.
Shelley was once a private person whose name had no more universal meaning than my own, and so were Byron and Cromwell and Shakespeare; yet now their names are facts as stubborn as the Rocky Mountains, or the National Gallery, or the circulation of the blood.
In all practical business matters, he was as incompetent as a Byron or a Shelley.
A man does not like to prove such a truth, Byron excepted from the catagory, jealousy.
I am a good swimmer (though without pretending to rival Byron or Edgar Poe, who were masters of the art), and in that plunge I did not lose my presence of mind.
People said that he resembled Byron--at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thousand years without growing old.
It is true that, under existing conditions, a few men who have had private means of their own, such as Byron, Shelley, Browning, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, and others, have been able to realise their personality more or less completely.
Your Byron would have worshipped her, and you--you cold, frigid islander
A similar admission has been made by other eminent voyagers: by Carteret, Byron, Kotzebue, and Vancouver.
Were Byron now alive, and Burns, the first would come from his ancestral abbey, flinging aside, although unwillingly, the inherited honors of a thousand years, to take the arm of the mighty peasant who grew immortal while he stooped behind his plough.
The intense energy of their expression is not surpassed by anything in Byron.