Byronic


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By·ron

 (bī′rən), George Gordon Sixth Baron Byron. 1788-1824.
British poet acclaimed as one of the leading figures of the romantic movement. The "Byronic hero"—lonely, rebellious, and brooding—first appeared in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812-1818). Among his other works are Manfred (1817) and the epic satire Don Juan (1819-1824). He died while working to secure Greek independence from the Turks.

By·ron′ic (bī-rŏn′ĭk) adj.
By·ron′i·cal·ly adv.

By•ron•ic

(baɪˈrɒn ɪk)

adj.
of or like Lord Byron or his work, as in displaying romanticism.
[1815–25]
By•ron′i•cal•ly, adv.
References in classic literature ?
His imagination and the books he had read had inspired in him a desire for the Byronic attitude; and he was torn between a morbid self-consciousness and a conviction that he owed it to himself to be gallant.
But in spite of all this melodramatic clap-trap the romances, like 'Childe Harold,' are filled with the tremendous Byronic passion, which, as in 'Childe Harold,' lends great power alike to their narrative and their description.
In the most important of them, 'Manfred,' a treatment of the theme which Marlowe and Goethe had used in 'Faust,' his real power is largely thwarted by the customary Byronic mystery and swagger.
Though not cold-natured, he was rather bright than hot--less Byronic than Shelleyan; could love desperately, but with a love more especially inclined to the imaginative and ethereal; it was a fastidious emotion which could jealously guard the loved one against his very self.
A sort of Byronic hero--an amorous conspirator, it strikes me.
But there came a time when Laurie ceased to worship at many shrines, hinted darkly at one all-absorbing passion, and indulged occasionally in Byronic fits of gloom.
The Byronic hero is chivalrous and devoted to women, but simultaneously obeys a solitary existence that cannot be fully tamed.
Shenk has no psychobiographical theory or therapy to promote, nor does he nurture any Byronic illusions about the redemptive or creative powers of melancholy.
Much of this is based on 'myth' created by the writer himself and is just as powerful as the Byronic myth and just as inaccurate.
At school, Reeves created some innovative amateur films, and later he managed to make it to the lower rungs of the profession, helped, no doubt, by a posh, Byronic charisma.
Jane Hall finds out why heart-throb actor Rufus Sewell has dispensed with his famous locks for his latest regal role - and why he hates being called Byronic.