Byzantium

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By·zan·ti·um

 (bĭ-zăn′shē-əm, -tē-əm)
1. The Byzantine Empire.
2. An ancient city of Thrace on the site of present-day Istanbul, Turkey. It was founded by the Greeks in the seventh century bc and taken by the Romans in ad 196. Constantine I ordered the rebuilding of the city in 330 and renamed it Constantinople.

Byzantium

(bɪˈzæntɪəm; baɪ-)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient Greek city on the Bosporus: founded about 660 bc; rebuilt by Constantine I in 330 ad and called Constantinople; present-day Istanbul
2. (Historical Terms) an ancient Greek city on the Bosporus: founded about 660 bc; rebuilt by Constantine I in 330 ad and called Constantinople; present-day Istanbul

By•zan•ti•um

(bɪˈzæn ʃi əm, -ti əm)

n.
an ancient Greek city on the Bosporus and the Sea of Marmara: rebuilt by Constantine I and renamed Constantinople A.D. 330. Compare Istanbul.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Byzantium - an ancient city on the Bosporus founded by the Greeks; site of modern Istanbul; in 330 Constantine I rebuilt the city and called it Constantinople and made it his capital
Byzantine Empire, Eastern Roman Empire, Byzantium - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Byzantine - a native or inhabitant of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire
2.Byzantium - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395Byzantium - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
Byzantium - an ancient city on the Bosporus founded by the Greeks; site of modern Istanbul; in 330 Constantine I rebuilt the city and called it Constantinople and made it his capital
Byzantine - a native or inhabitant of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire
Translations
روم شرفی
Bizant
Byzantium
Byzantion

Byzantium

nByzanz nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth, final, and longest phase, by far, was Byzantium, lasting from the fifth to the 15th century, during which emperors ruled as civilians from the city officially named New Rome but commonly called Constantinople ("Constantine's city") and founded originally as Byzantion (Byzantium in Latin).
The May 30 opening concert at the Royal Theatre Carre will be followed a week later by a multidisciplinary performance titled "From Byzantion to ystanbul," whose highlight will be performances by ystanbul-based singers Dilek TE-rkan and Vassiliki Papageorgiou.
Cartledge has chosen eleven cities grouped in periods: Cnossos and Mycenae (prehistory); Argos, Miletus, Massalia and Sparta (early history to 500 BC); Athens, Syracuse and Thebes (500-330 BC); Alexandria (Hellenistic) and Byzantion.
On imperial bride-shows in Byzantine history and literature, see Warren Treadgold, "The Bride-shows of the Byzantine Emperors," Byzantion 49 (1979): 395-413, who also mentions Esther 2 as the inspiration behind Byzantine bride shows (398); Lennart Ryden, "The Bride-shows at the Byzantine Court--History or Fiction?
How little, ancient Byzantion became Constantine's capital, how next that capital engendered the great Byzantine Christian culture up to the conquest of Mehmed II, who then turned it into a cosmopolitan centre where Orthodox Greeks of Phanarion coexisted alongside their new Ottoman rulers and the Armenians--all of this is the subject of an exhibition that is first and foremost a narrative of complex and entrenched history.
Vasiliev, "Pero Tafur, a Spanish Traveler of the Fifteenth Century and His Visit to Constantinople, Trebizond and Italy," Byzantion 7 (1932) 106 ff.