C-section


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C-sec·tion

(sē′sĕk′shən)
n.
A cesarean section.

ce•sar•e•an

(sɪˈzɛər i ən)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) Also called cesar′ean sec`tion. an operation by which a fetus is taken from the uterus by cutting through the walls of the abdomen and uterus.
adj.
2. (sometimes cap.) of or pertaining to a cesarean.
Also, caesarean , ce•sar′i•an.
[1900–05]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.C-section - the delivery of a fetus by surgical incision through the abdominal wall and uterus (from the belief that Julius Caesar was born that way)C-section - the delivery of a fetus by surgical incision through the abdominal wall and uterus (from the belief that Julius Caesar was born that way)
obstetrical delivery, delivery - the act of delivering a child
hysterotomy - surgical incision into the uterus (as in cesarean section)
Translations

C-section

V. cesarean section.
References in periodicals archive ?
Doctors at East Surrey Hospital in Redhill had to intervene to gave her an emergency C-section - and without it, Laura and baby Tahlia may have died.
Summary: From the beginning of her pregnancy, Abir Mansour knew that she didn't want a C-section.
If a pregnant woman feels slightly seedy in Osh City, she is put on c-section.
In a report published today in an international scientific journal, academics warn that increasingly popular C-section deliveries heighten the risk of the disorder by 23%.
She had given birth by emergency C-section and suffered a severe strain of pre-eclampsia.
Surgical site infections post C-section significantly increases maternal morbidity and prolongs hospital stays.
Compared with women whose first birth was a spontaneous vaginal delivery, primiparous women with a primary C-section were 14% more likely to have a subsequent stillbirth and 9% more likely to have a later ectopic pregnancy, but were no more likely to have a subsequent miscarriage, reported Dr.
We found that babies born by C-section, if exposed to an allergen, were eight times more likely to be sensitised to dog allergen.
Women with a pre-pregnancy BMI of 40 or more had the strongest risk of C-section and increased risk of vacuum extraction delivery.
However, the c-section infants were found to have lower circulating levels of Th1 chemical messengers in their blood, indicating an imbalance between Th1 and Th2.
Because a baby delivered buttocks- or feet-first can be in danger, many practitioners recommend a C-section when the baby isn't coming out head first.