Cain


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Cain

 (kān)
In the Bible, the eldest son of Adam and Eve, who murdered his brother Abel out of jealousy and was condemned to be a fugitive.

cain

(keɪn) or

kain

n
(Historical Terms) history (in Scotland and Ireland) payment in kind, usually farm produce paid as rent
[C12: from Scottish Gaelic cāin rent, perhaps ultimately from Late Latin canōn tribute (see canon); compare Middle Irish cāin law]

Cain

(keɪn)
n
1. (Biography) the first son of Adam and Eve, who killed his brother Abel (Genesis 4:1–16)
2. raise Cain
a. to cause a commotion
b. to react or protest heatedly

Cain

(keɪn)

n.
the first son of Adam and Eve, who murdered his brother Abel. Gen. 4.
Idioms:
raise Cain, to behave boisterously or violently; make a disturbance.
Cain•it′ic, adj.

Cain

(keɪn)
James M., 1892–1977, U.S. novelist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cain - (Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Cain killed Abel out of jealousy and was exiled by God
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Translations

Cain

[keɪn] NCaín
to raise Cainarmar la gorda, protestar enérgicamente

Cain

nKain m; to raise Cain (inf: = be noisy) → Radau machen (inf), → lärmen; (= protest)Krach schlagen (inf)

Cain

[keɪn] nCaino
References in classic literature ?
With her native energy of character and rare capacity, it could not entirely cast her off, although it had set a mark upon her, more intolerable to a woman's heart than that which branded the brow of Cain.
Very shy; always going solitary; unexpectedly rising to the surface in the remotest and most sullen waters; his straight and single lofty jet rising like a tall misanthropic spear upon a barren plain; gifted with such wondrous power and velocity in swimming, as to defy all present pursuit from man; this leviathan seems the banished and unconquerable Cain of his race, bearing for his mark that style upon his back.
Every time he got money he got drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed.
Then the old man cried and grieved, and said he was a murderer and the mark of Cain was on him, and he had disgraced his family and was going to be found out and hung.
He's as like Cain before he was grown up, as he can be.
He never even seemed to come to his work on purpose, but would slouch in as if by mere accident; and when he went to the Jolly Bargemen to eat his dinner, or went away at night, he would slouch out, like Cain or the Wandering Jew, as if he had no idea where he was going and no intention of ever coming back.
I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain.
An alarm Crow Indians Their appearance Mode of approach Their vengeful errand Their curiosity Hostility between the Crows and Blackfeet Loving conduct of the Crows Laramie's Fork First navigation of the Nebraska Great elevation of the country Rarity of the atmosphere Its effect on the wood-work of wagons Black Hills Their wild and broken scenery Indian dogs Crow trophies Sterile and dreary country Banks of the Sweet Water Buffalo hunting Adventure of Tom Cain the Irish cook
We hunted Cain, Some centuries ago, across the world, That bred the fear our own misdeeds maintain To-day.
There were Cain and Nimrod, and Nero, and Caligula, and Dionysius, and Pisistratus, and - and a thousand others, who never knew what it was to have a soul during the latter part of their lives; yet, sir, these men adorned society.
We have seen Titian's celebrated Cain and Abel, his David and Goliah, his Abraham's Sacrifice.
This sweat- bestained handkerchief terrified Philippe, as the gore of Abel frightened Cain.