CEGB


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

CEGB

abbreviation for
(Commerce) (the former) Central Electricity Generating Board
References in periodicals archive ?
CEGB maintained a plant margin of 28% but since the privatisation of the ESI in the 1990s the margin has collapsed to low single figures-7% be even less.
I remember the futurist Francis Kinsman describing an encounter with a CEGB manager after a talk he gave on the rise of the 'inner-directed' approach to life--those people who put independence, health and self-improvement above 'keeping up with the Joneses'.
The CEGB had a number of oil-fired power stations, dating from the days of cheap oil, which could be brought into use.
Mines could send their coal to nearby power stations relatively easily and, as the NCB and CEGB were owned by the state and had no interest in making life difficult for each other, it was a very convenient marriage.
Following the 1988 White Paper, 'Privatising electricity', the CEGB was divided into four companies on 31 March 1990.
Ownership of the non-nuclear generation function was divided between PowerGen and National Power, which were newly privatized and separated divisions of the CEGB.
A study by the UK's CEGB concluded that the potential for offshore wind power around the country was 230 TWh per annum -- equivalent to the total UK electricity supply at the time.
Peter was employed at the CEGB in Birmingham and then at Tube Investments and as a lecturer in various colleges culminating as Principal of the Rugby College of Further Education.
The National Grid Company of the UK was formed from the Transmission Division of the then state owned monopoly generating and transmission company the CEGB in 1990 at the time of privatisation and debundling of the electricity supply industry in UK.
Newbery and Pollitt (1996) have looked at these changes, reconstructing the accounts of the four successor companies to the CEGB and comparing the out-turn with various counterfactuals about what might have happened without such restructuring.
Arup Associates' two notable contributions - CEGB Bedminster Down and Gateway 2 for Wiggins Teape at Basingstoke - give evidence of the benefits of multi-disciplinary working.