chain


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chain
left to right: figaro, sash, and stud links

chain

 (chān)
n.
1.
a. A connected, flexible series of links, typically of metal, used especially for holding objects together, for restraining, or for transmitting mechanical power.
b. Such a set of links, often of precious metal and with pendants attached, worn as an ornament or symbol of office.
c. often chains Football Such a set of links measuring ten yards and attached to a pole at each end, moved up and down the field to indicate necessary yardage for gaining a first down.
2. A restraining or confining agent or force.
3. chains
a. Bonds, fetters, or shackles.
b. Captivity or oppression; bondage: threw off the chains of slavery.
4. A series of closely linked or connected things: a chain of coincidences. See Synonyms at series.
5. A number of establishments, such as stores, theaters, or hotels, under common ownership or management.
6. A range of mountains.
7. Chemistry A series of chemically bonded atoms, especially carbon atoms, which may be arranged in an open, branched, or cyclic structure.
8.
a. An instrument used in surveying, consisting of 100 linked pieces of iron or steel and measuring 66 feet (20.1 meters). Also called Gunter's chain.
b. A similar instrument used in engineering, measuring 100 feet (30.5 meters).
c. Abbr. ch A unit of measurement equal to the length of either of these instruments.
tr.v. chained, chain·ing, chains
1. To bind or make fast with a chain or chains: chained the dog to a tree.
2. To restrain or confine as if with chains: workers who were chained to a life of dull routine.
Idiom:
pull/yank (someone's) chain
To take unfair advantage of someone; deceive or manipulate someone.

[Middle English chaine, from Old French, from Latin catēna.]

chain

(tʃeɪn)
n
1. a flexible length of metal links, used for confining, connecting, pulling, etc, or in jewellery
2. (usually plural) anything that confines, fetters, or restrains: the chains of poverty.
3. (Automotive Engineering) (usually plural) Also called: snow chains a set of metal links that fit over the tyre of a motor vehicle to increase traction and reduce skidding on an icy surface
4. (Commerce)
a. a number of establishments such as hotels, shops, etc, having the same owner or management
b. (as modifier): a chain store.
5. a series of related or connected facts, events, etc
6. (Commerce) a series of deals in which each depends on a purchaser selling before being able to buy
7. (Logic) (of reasoning) a sequence of arguments each of which takes the conclusion of the preceding as a premise. See (as an example) sorites
8. (Units) Also called: Gunter's chain a unit of length equal to 22 yards
9. (Units) Also called: engineer's chain a unit of length equal to 100 feet
10. (Chemistry) chem two or more atoms or groups bonded together so that the configuration of the resulting molecule, ion, or radical resembles a chain. See also open chain, ring118
11. (Physical Geography) geography a series of natural features, esp approximately parallel mountain ranges
12. off the chain informal Austral and NZ free from responsibility
13. jerk someone's chain yank someone's chain informal to tease, mislead, or harass someone
vb
14. (Surveying) surveying to measure with a chain or tape
15. (often foll by: up) to confine, tie, or make fast with or as if with a chain
16. (Knitting & Sewing) to sew using chain stitch
[C13: from Old French chaine, ultimately from Latin; see catena]

Chain

(tʃeɪn)
n
(Biography) Sir Ernst Boris. 1906–79, British biochemist, born in Germany: purified and adapted penicillin for clinical use; with Fleming and Florey shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1945

chain

(tʃeɪn)

n.
1. a series of metal rings passing through one another, used either for hauling, supporting, or confining, or as decoration.
2. chains,
a. shackles or fetters.
b. bondage; servitude: to live one's life in chains.
3. a series of things connected or following in succession: a chain of events.
4. a range of mountains.
5. a number of establishments under one ownership or management.
6. two or more atoms of the same element, usu. carbon, attached as in a chain. Compare ring 1 (def. 14).
7.
a. a distance-measuring device used by surveyors, consisting of a chain of 100 links of equal length.
b. a unit of length equal to 100 feet (30 m) or 66 feet (20 m).
Abbr.: ch
v.t.
8. to fasten or secure with a chain.
9. to confine or restrain: His work chained him to his desk.
10. to chain-stitch.
v.i.
11. to form or make a chain.
[1250–1300; Middle English chayne < Old French chaeine < Latin catēna fetter; see catena]

Chain

(tʃeɪn)

n.
Sir Ernst Boris, 1906–79, English biochemist, born in Germany: Nobel prize 1945.

chain

Chain

 a series of things linked together into a chain, actually or figuratively. See also catena, cordon, series.
Examples: chain of buckets; of causes, 1829; of charity, 1377; of deductions, 1664; of discourse, 1651; of events; of human beings; of ideas; of islands; of lakes; of mountains; of proof; of reasoning, 1809; of shops or supermarkets; of spangles, 1841; of storms; of succession, 1655; of thought, 1711.

chain


Past participle: chained
Gerund: chaining

Imperative
chain
chain
Present
I chain
you chain
he/she/it chains
we chain
you chain
they chain
Preterite
I chained
you chained
he/she/it chained
we chained
you chained
they chained
Present Continuous
I am chaining
you are chaining
he/she/it is chaining
we are chaining
you are chaining
they are chaining
Present Perfect
I have chained
you have chained
he/she/it has chained
we have chained
you have chained
they have chained
Past Continuous
I was chaining
you were chaining
he/she/it was chaining
we were chaining
you were chaining
they were chaining
Past Perfect
I had chained
you had chained
he/she/it had chained
we had chained
you had chained
they had chained
Future
I will chain
you will chain
he/she/it will chain
we will chain
you will chain
they will chain
Future Perfect
I will have chained
you will have chained
he/she/it will have chained
we will have chained
you will have chained
they will have chained
Future Continuous
I will be chaining
you will be chaining
he/she/it will be chaining
we will be chaining
you will be chaining
they will be chaining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chaining
you have been chaining
he/she/it has been chaining
we have been chaining
you have been chaining
they have been chaining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chaining
you will have been chaining
he/she/it will have been chaining
we will have been chaining
you will have been chaining
they will have been chaining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chaining
you had been chaining
he/she/it had been chaining
we had been chaining
you had been chaining
they had been chaining
Conditional
I would chain
you would chain
he/she/it would chain
we would chain
you would chain
they would chain
Past Conditional
I would have chained
you would have chained
he/she/it would have chained
we would have chained
you would have chained
they would have chained

chain

A measure of length equal to 22 yd. Also known as Gunter’s chain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chain - a series of things depending on each other as if linked togetherchain - a series of things depending on each other as if linked together; "the chain of command"; "a complicated concatenation of circumstances"
catena - a chain of connected ideas or passages or objects so arranged that each member is closely related to the preceding and following members (especially a series of patristic comments elucidating Christian dogma)
daisy chain - (figurative) a series of associated things or people or experiences
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
2.chain - (chemistry) a series of linked atoms (generally in an organic molecule)
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
closed chain, ring - (chemistry) a chain of atoms in a molecule that forms a closed loop
long chain, long-chain molecule - (chemistry) a relatively long chain of atoms in a molecule
open chain - a chain of atoms in a molecule whose ends are not joined to form a ring
building block, unit - a single undivided natural thing occurring in the composition of something else; "units of nucleic acids"
molecule - (physics and chemistry) the simplest structural unit of an element or compound
3.chain - a series of (usually metal) rings or links fitted into one another to make a flexible ligament
anchor chain, anchor rope - the chain or rope that attaches an anchor to a vessel
bicycle, bike, cycle, wheel - a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
bicycle chain - a chain that transmits the power from the pedals to the rear wheel of a bicycle
chain printer - an impact printer that carries the type slugs by links of a revolving chain
chain tongs - a pipe wrench used for turning large pipes; an adjustable chain circles the pipe with its ends connected to the head whose teeth engage the pipe
chatelaine - a chain formerly worn at the waist by women; for carrying a purse or bunch of keys etc.
watch chain, watch guard, fob - short chain or ribbon attaching a pocket watch to a man's vest
ligament - any connection or unifying bond
paper chain - a chain made of loops of colored paper; used to decorate a room
pull chain - a chain (usually with a handle at the end) that is pulled in order to operate some mechanism (e.g. to flush a toilet)
snow chain, tire chain - chain attached to wheels to increase traction on ice or snow
4.chain - (business) a number of similar establishments (stores or restaurants or banks or hotels or theaters) under one ownership
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
chain store - one of a chain of retail stores under the same management and selling the same merchandise
business, business concern, business organisation, business organization, concern - a commercial or industrial enterprise and the people who constitute it; "he bought his brother's business"; "a small mom-and-pop business"; "a racially integrated business concern"
apparel chain - a chain of clothing stores
discount chain - a chain of discount stores
restaurant chain - a chain of restaurants
retail chain - a chain of retail stores
5.chain - anything that acts as a restraint
constraint, restraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
6.chain - a unit of length
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
yard, pace - a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride
Gunter's chain - a unit of length (22 yards)
engineer's chain - a unit of length (100 ft)
link - a unit of length equal to 1/100 of a chain
nautical chain - a nautical unit of length (15 ft)
7.Chain - British biochemist (born in Germany) who isolated and purified penicillin, which had been discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming (1906-1979)
8.chain - a series of hills or mountainschain - a series of hills or mountains; "the valley was between two ranges of hills"; "the plains lay just beyond the mountain range"
geological formation, formation - (geology) the geological features of the earth
massif - a block of the earth's crust bounded by faults and shifted to form peaks of a mountain range
mountain pass, notch, pass - the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks; "we got through the pass before it started to snow"
9.chain - a linked or connected series of objects; "a chain of daisies"
necklace - jewelry consisting of a cord or chain (often bearing gems) worn about the neck as an ornament (especially by women)
10.chain - a necklace made by a stringing objects together; "a string of beads"; "a strand of pearls";
necklace - jewelry consisting of a cord or chain (often bearing gems) worn about the neck as an ornament (especially by women)
Verb1.chain - connect or arrange into a chain by linking
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
concatenate - combine two strings to form a single one
2.chain - fasten or secure with chains; "Chain the chairs together"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
unchain - remove the chains from

chain

noun
1. tether, coupling, link, bond, shackle, fetter, manacle The dogs were growling and pulling at their chains.
2. group, multiple A new chain of shops is to be opened next year.
3. series, set, train, string, sequence, succession, progression, concatenation a horrific chain of events
verb
1. bind, confine, restrain, handcuff, shackle, tether, fetter, manacle We were kept in a cell, chained to the wall.

chain

noun
1. Something that physically confines the legs or arms.Used in plural:
bond, fetter, handcuff (often used in plural), hobble, iron (used in plural), manacle, restraint, shackle.
Archaic: gyve.
2. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
verb
To restrict the activity or free movement of:
Informal: hog-tie.
Translations
تَسَلْسُلِ الأحْداثسِلْسِلَةسِلْسِلَهيُقَيِّد
веригапоредица
řetězřetězecřetízekuvázat na řetěz
kædelænkerække
ĉeno
ahelkett
ketju
lanac
láncláncolatmegláncolsorsorozat
hlekkjakeîjaröî
사슬
catena
grandinėgrandinėlėprekybos tinklui priklausanti parduotuvėprirakintivirtinė
ķēdeķēdītepieķēdētsērijavirkne
lanţ
retiazkaupevniť reťazou
verigaverižicaprikleniti
kedja
โซ่
zincirzincire vurmakzincirlemekdizi
xích

chain

[tʃeɪn]
A. N
1. (lit) → cadena f
to pull the chain [of lavatory] → tirar de la cadena
2. chains (= fetters) → cadenas fpl, grillos mpl (Aut) → cadenas fpl
in chainsencadenado
3. (fig) chain of mountainscordillera f
chain of shopscadena f de tiendas
chain of commandcadena f de mando
chain of eventsserie f de acontecimientos
to form a human chainformar una cadena humana
4. (= measure) medida de longitud equivalente a 22 yardas o 20,12 metros
B. VTencadenar
he was chained to the wallestaba encadenado a la pared
C. CPD chain gang N (US) → cadena f de presidiarios
chain letter Ncarta f que circula en cadena (con promesa de una ganancia cuantiosa para los que siguen las indicaciones que da)
chain lightning Nrelámpagos mpl en zigzag
chain mail Ncota f de malla
chain pump Nbomba f de cangilones
chain reaction Nreacción f en cadena
chain smoker Nfumador(a) m/f empedernido/a
chain stitch N (Sew) → punto m de cadeneta, cadeneta f
chain store Ntienda f que pertenece a una cadena
chain up VT + ADVencadenar

chain

[ˈtʃeɪn]
n
(metal)chaîne f
[shops] → chaîne f
[islands] → chaîne f
(= sequence) [events] → série f
vt
(= fasten with a chain) [+ prisoner] → enchaîner, attacher (avec une chaîne)
to chain o.s. to sth → s'enchaîner à qch
to chain one's bike to sth → attacher son vélo à qch
chain up
vt [+ animal] → mettre à l'attache; [+ person] → enchaîner
to keep a dog chained up → laisser un chien attachéchain gang nchaîne f de forçatschain letter nlettre f faisant partie d'une chaînechain mail n (= armour) → cotte f de mailleschain reaction nréaction f en chaînechain saw ntronçonneuse fchain-smoke [ˈtʃeɪnsməʊk] vifumer cigarette sur cigarettechain-smoker ngros(se) fumeur/euse m/fchain store nmagasin m à succursales multiples

chain

n
Kette f; chains (lit, fig: = fetters) → Ketten pl, → Fesseln pl; (Aut) → (Schnee)ketten pl; chain of officeAmtskette f; to keep a dog on a chaineinen Hund an der Kette halten; to pull or yank somebody’s chain (esp US fig) → jdn necken; in chainsin Ketten
(of mountains)(Berg)kette f, → (Gebirgs)kette f; (of atoms etc)Kette f; chain of shopsLadenkette f; to make a chaineine Kette bilden; chain of eventsKette von Ereignissen; chain of evidenceBeweiskette f; chain of command (Mil) → Befehlskette f
(= measure of length)Messkette f
vt (lit, fig)anketten, festketten; dogan die Kette legen, anketten; to chain somebody/something to somethingjdn/etw an etw (acc)ketten

chain

in cpdsKetten-;
chain bridge
chain drive
nKettenantrieb m, → Kettengetriebe f
chain gang
nTruppe faneinandergeketteter Sträflinge, Sträflingskolonne f
chain letter
nKettenbrief m
chain lightning
nLinienblitz m
chain-link fence
chain mail
nKettenhemd nt
chain reaction
chain saw
nKettensäge f
chain-smoke
vieine (Zigarette) nach der anderen rauchen, kettenrauchen infin only
chain smoker
nKettenraucher(in) m(f)
chain stitch
n (Sew) → Kettenstich m
chain store
nKettenladen m

chain

[tʃeɪn]
1. n (gen) → catena
gold chain → catenina d'oro
2. vt (also chain up) → incatenare
chain up vt + adv (prisoner) → incatenare; (dog) → mettere alla catena

chain

(tʃein) noun
1. a series of (especially metal) links or rings passing through one another. The dog was fastened by a chain; She wore a silver chain round her neck.
2. a series. a chain of events.
verb
to fasten or bind with chains. The prisoner was chained to the wall.
chain mail
armour made of iron links.
chain store
one of a series of shops (often department stores) under the same ownership.

chain

سِلْسِلَة řetěz kæde Kette αλυσίδα cadena ketju chaîne lanac catena 사슬 ketting kjede łańcuch corrente цепь kedja โซ่ zincir xích

chain

n. cadena;
___ reactionreacción en ___;
___ suturesutura en ___.

chain

n cadena; branched-chain de cadena ramificada; — of cold cadena de frío; — of custody cadena de custodia; — of survival cadena de supervivencia; — reaction reacción f en cadena; heavy — cadena pesada; light — cadena ligera; long-chain de cadena larga; medium-chain de cadena media
References in classic literature ?
Something in the voices of the men talking in the hotel office started a chain of thoughts in his mind.
After the first surprise of the intelligence had a little abated, a rumor was spread through the entrenched camp, which stretched along the margin of the Hudson, forming a chain of outworks to the body of the fort itself, that a chosen detachment of fifteen hundred men was to depart, with the dawn, for William Henry, the post at the northern extremity of the portage.
But the story would include a chain of events extending over the better part of two centuries, and, written out with reasonable amplitude, would fill a bigger folio volume, or a longer series of duodecimos, than could prudently be appropriated to the annals of all New England during a similar period.
Morally, as well as materially, there was a coarser fibre in those wives and maidens of old English birth and breeding than in their fair descendants, separated from them by a series of six or seven generations; for, throughout that chain of ancestry, every successive mother had transmitted to her child a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty, and a slighter physical frame, if not character of less force and solidity than her own.
cried my friend again; the chain of my logic was ever too much for her.
Broad on both bows, at the distance of some two or three miles, and forming a great semicircle, embracing one half of the level horizon, a continuous chain of whale-jets were up-playing and sparkling in the noon-day air.
They had chains which they fastened about the leg of the nearest hog, and the other end of the chain they hooked into one of the rings upon the wheel.
She is obedient - as is proper for a titled and recognized military personage, which she is - but the chain presses sometimes.
He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane -- the awful- est old gray-headed nabob in the State.
There was a case which, when the cover was lifted, disclosed a long chain of delicate pink coral beads,--a chain ending in a cross made of coral rosebuds.
Pardon, Monseigneur; he swung by the chain of the shoe--the drag.
They were succeeded by a clanking noise, deep down below; as if some person were dragging a heavy chain over the casks in the wine merchant's cellar.