Children

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chil·dren

 (chĭl′drən)
n.
Plural of child.

children

(ˈtʃɪldrən)
n
the plural of child

child

(tʃaɪld)

n., pl. chil•dren.
1. a person between birth and full growth; a young boy or girl.
2. a son or daughter.
3. a baby or infant.
4. a human fetus.
5. a person who behaves in a childish manner.
6. a descendant.
7. any person or thing regarded as the product of particular circumstances or influences: children of poverty.
8. Archaic. childe.
Idioms:
1. great or big with child, (of a human female) being in the late stages of pregnancy.
2. with child, (of a human female) pregnant.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English cild; akin to Gothic kilthai womb]
child′less, adj.
child′less•ness, n.

Children

See also father; mother; parents.

the condition of being a bastard.
1. a parent who kills a son or daughter.
2. the killing of a son or daughter by a parent. — filicidal, adj.
abnormal or excessive activity or constant excitability, especially in children. — hyperactive, adj.
an abnormal dislike of children. — misopedist, misopaedist, n.
the science or art of teaching or education. Also called pedagogy. — pedagogue, paedagogue, pedagog, n.
a sexual act between two males, especially when one is a minor. — pederast, paederast, n.
the branch of medicine that studies the diseases of children and their treatment. — pediatrician, paediatrician, n.
a branch of dentistry specializing in children’s dental care. — pedodontist, n.
the branch of medical science that studies the physical and psychological events of childhood. — pedologist, n. — pedological, adj.
a sexual attraction to children. — pedophiliac, pedophilic, adj.
an abnormal fear of children. — pedophobiac, n.
the quality or condition of being the youngest child. See also law.
the quality or condition of being a firstborn child. See also law.
1. the crime of killing one’s own children.
2. a parent who kills his own children. — prolicidal, adj.
pedology.
postremogeniture.
the quality or condition of being an only child.

Children

 

See Also: PARENTHOOD

  1. A baby is like a beast, it does not think —Aeschylus
  2. Childhood is like a mirror, which reflects in after life the images first presented to it —Samuel Smiles
  3. Childhood … like so many oatmeal cookies —Frank O’Hara
  4. Childhood shows the man, as the morning shows the day —John Milton
  5. Children are like beggars; often coming without being called —Proverb
  6. Children are like leaves on a tree —Marcus Aurelius
  7. Children are like puppies: you have to keep them near you and look after them if you want to have their affection —Anna Magnani
  8. Children are like pancakes: You should always throw out the first one —Peter Benchley
  9. Children [in families] are like rival pretenders to a throne and their main object in life is to eliminate their competitors —Milton R. Sapirstein
  10. Children in a family are like flowers in a bouquet: there’s always one determined to face in an opposite direction from the way the arranger desires —Marcelene Cox
  11. Children like apples … good enough to eat —Donald Culross
  12. Children … like robins, pink-cheeked and rosy —Lawrence Durrell
  13. Children … they string our joys, like jewels bright, upon the thread of years —Edward A. Guest
  14. The faces of the kids … suddenly deprived by fear of their childhood, looked like ancient agonized adults —Herbert Gold
  15. A happy childhood can’t be cured. Mine’ll hang around my neck like a rainbow —Hortense Calisher

    This is the opening for the novel, Queenie, in which the author is much sparer with her similes than she is in her short stories.

  16. Ladies touch babies like bankers touch gold —James Ferry

    One of two similes from a little rhyme within a short story entitled Dancing Ducks.

  17. Life without children is like a tree without leaves —Milan Kundera
  18. A little girl without a doll is almost as unfortunate and quite as impossible as a woman without children —Victor Hugo
  19. Maternal testimony notwithstanding, babies are like biscuits in a pan —Ellery Sedgewick
  20. My childhood clings to me like wet paint —Daphne Merkin

    In Enchantment, a novel about a young woman’s search for self-discovery, the simile concludes: “Blotching the picture of who I am in the present.”

  21. With children as with plants … future character is indicated by their early disposition —Demophilus
Translations
děti
lapset
filiiliberipueri
watoto

children

[ˈtʃɪldrən] npl of childchildren's home [ˈtʃɪldrənzhəʊm] nfoyer m d'accueil (pour enfants)child restraint ndispositif m de retenue pour enfantchild seat n (in car)siège m enfantchild sex abuser nauteur m de sévices sexuels sur enfant(s)child's play [ˈtʃaɪldzpleɪ] n
It's child's play → C'est un jeu d'enfant.child star nenfant mf star
Children   

children

pl de child
References in classic literature ?
So he married, and in the following years several children were born to him; but peace and order did not come to the household.
Every afternoon, as they were coming from school, the children used to go and play in the Giant's garden.
Children sweeten labors; but they make misfortunes more bitter.
Well, then--they were all children there, and I was always among children and only with children.
Meanwhile Dolly and the children had moved into the country, to cut down expenses as much as possible.
TO ALL CHILDREN CHILDREN IN YEARS AND CHILDREN IN HEART I DEDICATE THIS STORY
He told his sister, if she pleased, the new-born infant should be bred up together with little Tommy; to which she consented, though with some little reluctance: for she had truly a great complacence for her brother; and hence she had always behaved towards the foundling with rather more kindness than ladies of rigid virtue can sometimes bring themselves to show to these children, who, however innocent, may be truly called the living monuments of incontinence.
cried the bear; 'it is a wretched palace, and you are not King's children, you are disreputable children
Then I took the matter in hand: I left him alone and began with nurse's help to get the other children up, telling him that I did not love him.
Frank Baum and his correspondents," for I have used many suggestions conveyed to me in letters from children.
One afternoon of a cold winter's day, when the sun shone forth with chilly brightness, after a long storm, two children asked leave of their mother to run out and play in the new-fallen snow.
It is also absurd for those who promote a community of children to forbid those who love each other from indulging themselves in the last excesses of that passion, while they do not restrain them from the passion itself, or those intercourses which are of all things most improper, between a Father and a son, a brother and a brother, and indeed the thing itself is most absurd.

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