CJD


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CJD

abbr.
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

CJD

abbreviation for
(Pathology) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.CJD - rare (usually fatal) brain disease (usually in middle age) caused by an unidentified slow virus; characterized by progressive dementia and gradual loss of muscle control
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Translations

CJD

[ˌsiːˌdʒeɪˈdiː] n (=Creutzfeld Jacob disease) → MCJ f

CJD

abbr of Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseaseCJK f
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this study targeted patients with CJD, misdiagnosing CJD in a patient who has a different etiology for their rapidly progressive dementia is just as harmful, because many of these other dementias are treatable.
He said: "It is very distressing for people who have had surgery at Beaumont Hospital to learn that, for some, there is a danger of potential CJD infection.
Although specific CJD treatments are not available, prospects for their development and effectiveness could be enhanced by early and accurate diagnoses.
National Library of Medicine, classic CJD "occurs for no known reason.
The CJD will use HiQube to aggregate and manage information from various data sources to perform advanced analytics and publish interactive reports to monitor key performances across its finance, human resources, customers, market, competitive research and general business development functions.
Jorg Hoffman, consultant in communicable disease control, said there had only been six cases worldwide of CJD being transmitted via surgery.
One problem that has plagued developers of non-biopsy diagnostic techniques is that it is often difficult to avoid false positives among samples taken from patients with neurodegenerative disorders other than CJD.
His daughters, Catherine Burrows and Elizabeth Wolfenden, today described the devastating effect of CJD as "Alzheimer's in fast forward".
In this review, the presentation, pathology and incidence of CJD are examined, with particular reference to iatrogenic transmission.
Prof James Ironside, of the National CJD Surveillance Unit at Edinburgh University, will tell an audience today that this underlines the need for a rapid screening test for the disease.
It has also been quietly revealed that a variant of CJD (vCJD) may have been spread throughout the blood transfusion system in the United Kingdom, from vCJD-infected donors.
Scrapie exposure has not been demonstrated to increase CJD risk, despite extensive human exposure (18).