CJD


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CJD

abbr.
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

CJD

abbreviation for
(Pathology) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.CJD - rare (usually fatal) brain disease (usually in middle age) caused by an unidentified slow virus; characterized by progressive dementia and gradual loss of muscle control
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Translations

CJD

[ˌsiːˌdʒeɪˈdiː] n (=Creutzfeld Jacob disease) → MCJ f

CJD

abbr of Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseaseCJK f
References in periodicals archive ?
Il s'agit d'un concours organise depuis 2008 par le CJD et la Konrad Adenauer Stiftung avec pour objectif de recompenser de jeunes dirigeants tunisiens ayant fait preuve de leadership dans le developpement de leur entreprise, de valoriser dans les parcours le sens de l'initiative et l'originalite des projets et de promouvoir l'innovation et l'entrepreneuriat.
This exciting advance, the culmination of decades of studies on prion diseases, markedly improves on available diagnostic tests for CJD that are less reliable, more difficult for patients to tolerate, and require more time to obtain results," says Anthony S.
Keywords: CJD, Pakistan, Rapidly progressive dementia (RPD).
When a case of CJD is diagnosed a review is undertaken to ensure that any precautions, if needed, are taken in line with national and international guidance.
CJD causes brain damage, profound cognitive and behaviour changes, dementia, movement abnormalities, and neurological symptoms--seizures and visual problems (Ryan.
The investigators described their study as the first large-scale examination "of pathologically proven cases of spontaneous CJD that retrospectively determines what misdiagnoses are made in the work-up of [the disease], who makes these misdiagnoses, and how long it takes to reach the correct diagnosis.
National Library of Medicine, classic CJD "occurs for no known reason.
Jorg Hoffman, consultant in communicable disease control, said there had only been six cases worldwide of CJD being transmitted via surgery.
One problem that has plagued developers of non-biopsy diagnostic techniques is that it is often difficult to avoid false positives among samples taken from patients with neurodegenerative disorders other than CJD.
CJD is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive changes, behavioral changes, gait disturbances, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus.
His daughters, Catherine Burrows and Elizabeth Wolfenden, today described the devastating effect of CJD as "Alzheimer's in fast forward".
In this review, the presentation, pathology and incidence of CJD are examined, with particular reference to iatrogenic transmission.