infrared astronomy

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infrared astronomy

n.
The branch of astronomy that uses observations of emissions in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum to study extraterrestrial sources such as stars, planets, galaxies, and interstellar gas and dust clouds.

infrared astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the study of radiations from space in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum
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So, we obtain the ratio between the density of the Earth microwave background at the L2 point, at the COBE orbit, and that at the U2 altitude is
The COBE test would have been met and the new entity would indeed have been a tax-free A reorganization.
With its ability to delineate the first acoustic peak unambiguously, "MAP will be the COBE of the future," says Myers.
Given sufficient scattering at all frequencies, at the position of COBE [5], the signal examined must be isotropic.
Above all, says Mather, he hopes that the new telescope will begin to fill in the murky gap between the minuscule lumps recorded by COBE and the large-scale structure that emerged less than 1 billion years later.
The COBE satellite [6-12] provided the most important confirmation of the thermal nature of the "CMB" [1].
The COBE requirement is fundamental to the notion that tax-free reorganizations merely readjust continuing interests in property.
The project scientist, fellow principal investigator, and originator of the COBE mission concept was John C.
The COBE satellite, launched in 1989, has on board two instruments targeting the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), namely the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) and the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR).
One of the major expansions of the COBE doctrine introduced by the final regulations is the ability to transfer target assets to partnerships.
An instrument aboard COBE had discovered tiny irregularities in the microwave background radiation that fills the sky, radiation left over from the late stages of the Big Bang.
the COBE team unveiled a new sky map based on an additional year of data.