craze


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craze

 (krāz)
v. crazed, craz·ing, craz·es
v.tr.
1. To cause to become mentally deranged or obsessed.
2. To produce a network of fine cracks in the surface or glaze of.
v.intr.
1. To become mentally deranged or obsessed.
2. To become covered with fine cracks.
n.
1. A short-lived popular fashion; a fad.
2. A fine crack in a surface or glaze.

[Middle English crasen, to shatter, of Scandinavian origin.]

craze

(kreɪz)
n
1. a short-lived current fashion
2. a wild or exaggerated enthusiasm: a craze for chestnuts.
3. (Psychiatry) mental disturbance; insanity
vb
4. (Psychiatry) to make or become mad
5. (Ceramics) ceramics metallurgy to develop or cause to develop a fine network of cracks
6. (tr) archaic or dialect Brit to break
7. (tr) archaic to weaken
[C14 (in the sense: to break, shatter): probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish krasa to shatter, ultimately of imitative origin]

craze

(kreɪz)

v. crazed, craz•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to make insane; derange.
2. to make small cracks on the surface of (a ceramic glaze, paint, or the like); crackle.
v.i.
3. to become insane.
4. to become minutely cracked, as a ceramic glaze; crackle.
5. Metall. (of a case-hardened object) to develop reticulated surface markings.
n.
6. a popular fad; mania.
7. a minute crack or pattern of cracks in the glaze of a ceramic object.
[1325–75; Middle English crasen to crush < Scandinavian; compare Swedish, Norwegian krasa to shatter, crush]

craze

- First a crack or flaw; to craze is to produce minute cracks on the surface of pottery.
See also related terms for pottery.

craze


Past participle: crazed
Gerund: crazing

Imperative
craze
craze
Present
I craze
you craze
he/she/it crazes
we craze
you craze
they craze
Preterite
I crazed
you crazed
he/she/it crazed
we crazed
you crazed
they crazed
Present Continuous
I am crazing
you are crazing
he/she/it is crazing
we are crazing
you are crazing
they are crazing
Present Perfect
I have crazed
you have crazed
he/she/it has crazed
we have crazed
you have crazed
they have crazed
Past Continuous
I was crazing
you were crazing
he/she/it was crazing
we were crazing
you were crazing
they were crazing
Past Perfect
I had crazed
you had crazed
he/she/it had crazed
we had crazed
you had crazed
they had crazed
Future
I will craze
you will craze
he/she/it will craze
we will craze
you will craze
they will craze
Future Perfect
I will have crazed
you will have crazed
he/she/it will have crazed
we will have crazed
you will have crazed
they will have crazed
Future Continuous
I will be crazing
you will be crazing
he/she/it will be crazing
we will be crazing
you will be crazing
they will be crazing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been crazing
you have been crazing
he/she/it has been crazing
we have been crazing
you have been crazing
they have been crazing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been crazing
you will have been crazing
he/she/it will have been crazing
we will have been crazing
you will have been crazing
they will have been crazing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been crazing
you had been crazing
he/she/it had been crazing
we had been crazing
you had been crazing
they had been crazing
Conditional
I would craze
you would craze
he/she/it would craze
we would craze
you would craze
they would craze
Past Conditional
I would have crazed
you would have crazed
he/she/it would have crazed
we would have crazed
you would have crazed
they would have crazed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.craze - an interest followed with exaggerated zealcraze - an interest followed with exaggerated zeal; "he always follows the latest fads"; "it was all the rage that season"
fashion - the latest and most admired style in clothes and cosmetics and behavior
2.craze - state of violent mental agitationcraze - state of violent mental agitation  
nympholepsy - a frenzy of emotion; as for something unattainable
manic disorder, mania - a mood disorder; an affective disorder in which the victim tends to respond excessively and sometimes violently
epidemic hysertia, mass hysteria - a condition in which a large group of people exhibit the same state of violent mental agitation
3.craze - a fine crack in a glaze or other surface
crack - a blemish resulting from a break without complete separation of the parts; "there was a crack in the mirror"
Verb1.craze - cause to go crazycraze - cause to go crazy; cause to lose one's mind
derange, unbalance - derange mentally, throw out of mental balance; make insane; "The death of his parents unbalanced him"
2.craze - develop a fine network of cracks; "Crazed ceramics"
crack - break partially but keep its integrity; "The glass cracked"

craze

noun fad, thing, fashion, trend, passion, rage, enthusiasm, mode, vogue, novelty, preoccupation, mania, infatuation, the latest thing (informal) Aerobics is the latest fitness craze.

craze

verb
To make insane:
noun
1. The current custom:
Informal: thing.
Idioms: the in thing, the last word, the latest thing.
2. A subject or activity that inspires lively interest:
Translations
هَوَس، ولَع شَديد
mániemóda
dillemani
tískufyrirbrigîi, della
beprotiškaibeprotiškasbeprotiškumaseinantis iš protomada
aizraušanāsmode

craze

[kreɪz] N (= fashion) → moda f (for de) (= fad) → manía f (for por) it's the latest crazees la última moda, es el último grito

craze

[ˈkreɪz] n (= fashion) the latest dance craze → la nouvelle danse à la mode
Walking is the latest fitness craze → La marche est la dernière mode en matière d'exercice.

craze

nFimmel m (inf); it’s all the craze (inf)das ist große Mode; there’s a craze for collecting old things just nowes ist zurzeit große Mode, alte Sachen zu sammeln
vt
(= make insane) a crazed gunmanein Amokschütze m; to be half crazed with griefvor Schmerz halb wahnsinnig sein; he had a crazed look on his faceer hatte den Gesichtsausdruck eines Wahnsinnigen
pottery, glazingrissig machen
vi (pottery)rissig werden

craze

[kreɪz]
1. nmania
2. vt
b. (pottery, glaze) → incrinare
3. vi (pottery, glaze, windscreen) → incrinarsi

craze

(kreiz) noun
a (usually temporary) fashion; great (but temporary) enthusiasm. the current craze for cutting one's hair extremely short.
ˈcrazy adjective
1. insane. He must be going crazy; a crazy idea.
2. very enthusiastic. She's crazy about her boyfriend.
ˈcrazily adverb
ˈcraziness noun

craze

n. manía, locura.
References in classic literature ?
The craze for "cheap and nasty" telephony is passing; and the idea that the telephone is above all else a SPEED instrument, is gaining ground.
These reflections made him waver in his purpose, but his craze being stronger than any reasoning, he made up his mind to have himself dubbed a knight by the first one he came across, following the example of others in the same case, as he had read in the books that brought him to this pass.
His hopeful craze seemed to mock her own want of hope with so bitter an aptness that in her ner- vous irritation she could have screamed at him out- right.
I would rather you had kept the craze, so that you had kept the practice which went with it
I spent about two pounds on sixpenny postal orders when the Limerick craze was on, and didn't win a thing.
The present craze for gladiatorial athleticism I regard as one of the great evils of the age; but the thinly veiled professionalism of the so-called amateur is the greatest evil of that craze.
Do not craze yourself with thinking, but go about your business anywhere.
A pleasant, hospitable woman, with a harmless craze for the small lions of literary society; a rather dull man, doing his duty in that state of life in which a merciful Providence had placed him; two nice-looking, healthy children.
One of these was the craze for Greek and Latin learning, and the other was a desire to hold office.
This craze could not last, of course, but it lasted beyond our stay in Columbus, which ended with the winter, when the Legislature adjourned, and my father's employment ceased.
Well," said Dorothy, "there used to be a picture puzzle craze in Kansas, and so I've had some 'sperience matching puzzles.
Most influential, however, for the time-being, was Lyly's style, which is the most conspicuous English example of the later Renaissance craze, then rampant throughout Western Europe, for refining and beautifying the art of prose expression in a mincingly affected fashion.