Canaan

(redirected from Caananite)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Ca·naan

 (kā′nən)
An ancient region of the southern Levant including the land between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean as well as much of present-day Lebanon and Jordan and parts of western Syria. In the Bible it is the Promised Land of the Israelites.

Canaan

(ˈkeɪnən)
n
(Bible) an ancient region between the River Jordan and the Mediterranean, corresponding roughly to Israel: the Promised Land of the Israelites

Ca•naan

(ˈkeɪ nən)

n.
1. the ancient region lying between the Jordan, the Dead Sea, and the Mediterranean: the land promised by God to Abraham. Gen. 12:5–10.
2. Biblical name of Palestine (def 1).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Canaan - an ancient country in southwestern Asia on the east coast of the Mediterranean SeaCanaan - an ancient country in southwestern Asia on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea; a place of pilgrimage for Christianity and Islam and Judaism
Juda, Judah - an ancient kingdom of southern Palestine with Jerusalem as its center
Judaea, Judea - the southern part of ancient Palestine succeeding the kingdom of Judah; a Roman province at the time of Christ
Samaria - an ancient city in central Palestine founded in the 9th century BC as the capital of the northern Hebrew kingdom of Israel; the site is in present-day northwestern Jordan
Philistia - an ancient region on the coast of southwestern Palestine that was strategically located on a trade route between Syria and Egypt; important in biblical times
Asia - the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations
Jordan, Jordan River - a river in Palestine that empties into the Dead Sea; John the Baptist baptized Jesus in the Jordan
chebab - a Palestinian juvenile 10-15 years old who fights against the Israelis
Translations
Kanaan
Kánaán

Canaan

[ˈkeɪnən] NCanaán m

Canaan

nKanaan nt
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Cassuto gives a similar explanation, and writes that in ancient Caananite languages the word for "what" is man.
In the next chapter Piterberg subjects the foundational myths (exile, return, and history) of Zionist discourse to a Caananite critique.
In fact, the original term El Elyon, translated "Most High" and "generally regarded as having derived from the Caananite creator god worshipped at pre-Israelite Jerusalem",(7) was later adopted as an epithet for Yahweh.