cadenza

(redirected from Cadenzas)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ca·den·za

 (kə-dĕn′zə)
n.
1. An elaborate, ornamental melodic flourish interpolated into an aria or other vocal piece.
2. An extended virtuosic section for the soloist usually near the end of a movement of a concerto.

[Italian, from Old Italian, cadence; see cadence.]

cadenza

(kəˈdɛnzə)
n
1. (Classical Music) a virtuoso solo passage occurring near the end of a piece of music, formerly improvised by the soloist but now usually specially composed
2. informal South African a fit or convulsion
[C19: from Italian; see cadence]

ca•den•za

(kəˈdɛn zə)

n., pl. -zas.
an elaborate flourish or showy solo passage, sometimes improvised, introduced near the end of an aria or a movement of a concerto.
[1745–55; < Italian < Vulgar Latin *cadentia a falling]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cadenza - a brilliant solo passage occurring near the end of a piece of music
musical passage, passage - a short section of a musical composition
Translations
kadencia

cadenza

[kəˈdenzə] Ncadencia f

cadenza

[kəˈdɛnzə] n (MUSIC)cadence f

cadenza

n (Mus) → Kadenz f
References in periodicals archive ?
The first movement is in three large sections separated by short horn cadenzas.
Even in Mendelssohn's time the cadenzas were getting so elaborate that they were very rarely improvised anymore.
His extravagant cadenzas may have shown off his ability, but it's a close call as to whether they added to - or detracted from - the piece.
And his multi-stopping in the superbly executed cadenzas was almost uncannily accurate.
Indeed, he engages in direct dialogue with Wolff's work on the cadenzas of Mozart's piano concertos.
3) As Bribitzer-Stull puts it, conventional wisdom holds that the cadenza is a musical parenthesis: like linguistic parenthetical remarks, cadenzas may be engaging, illuminating, and insightful, but they are not regarded as intrinsic to structural coherence.
Students compete for standard baroque through contemporary repertory prizes, as well as in novel categories such as original concerto cadenzas, jazz or classical improvisation, versatility, lyricism in slow works, original compositions, works by female composers and tasteful arrangements or transcriptions.
The form is AB-AC-AB--Coda with identical flute cadenzas at the end of the first AB section and at the end of the piece as a whole, though the final cadenza is finished with trills in a rising outline of the G major chord (to G6).
From its lovely opening soliloquy on Richard Weigall's fluency increased with his confidence, moving felicitously from the elegant to the cheekily prankish and proving with real flair that Strauss's cadenzas were just the stuff he can thrive on.
The first movement is rather long and perhaps some thought the concerto was over, or perhaps the Worcester audience had joined the vanguard of Italian audiences who lately have begun applauding not only after movements but sometimes right after energetic cadenzas, seeking to make concerts a bit more interactive.
The piece was written in 1773 during the 17-year-old Mozart's trip to Vienna and it contains new cadenzas to piano concertos and music to a Minuet for a string quartet.
A melody peaks, evens out and mellows, Soft cadenzas beckon childhood's sandman And dream the pliant frame of a ballerina Forever dancing to a tune's pleated bellows Trembling into the narrows of a reed-organ.