Caesar

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cae·sar

also Cae·sar  (sē′zər)
n.
1. Used as a title and form of address for Roman emperors.
2. A dictator or autocrat.

[Middle English cesar, from Latin Caesar, after Julius Caesar.]

Caesar

(ˈsiːzə)
n
1. (Biography) Gaius Julius (ˈɡaɪəs ˈdʒuːlɪəs). 100–44 bc, Roman general, statesman, and historian. He formed the first triumvirate with Pompey and Crassus (60), conquered Gaul (58–50), invaded Britain (55–54), mastered Italy (49), and defeated Pompey (46). As dictator of the Roman Empire (49–44) he destroyed the power of the corrupt Roman nobility. He also introduced the Julian calendar and planned further reforms, but fear of his sovereign power led to his assassination (44) by conspirators led by Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longinus
2. (Historical Terms) any Roman emperor
3. (sometimes not capital) any emperor, autocrat, dictator, or other powerful ruler
4. (Historical Terms) a title of the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian
5. (Historical Terms) (in the Roman Empire)
a. a title borne by the imperial heir from the reign of Hadrian
b. the heir, deputy, and subordinate ruler to either of the two emperors under Diocletian's system of government
6. (Cookery) short for Caesar salad

Cae•sar

(ˈsi zər)

n.
1. Gaius Julius, c100–44 B.C., Roman general, statesman, and historian.
2. a title of the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian, and later of the heirs presumptive.
3. any emperor.
4. a tyrant or dictator.
5. any temporal ruler; civil authority. Matt. 22:21.

Caesar


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An aristocratic Roman family name which became an imperial title.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Caesar - conqueror of Gaul and master of Italy (100-44 BC)Caesar - conqueror of Gaul and master of Italy (100-44 BC)
2.Caesar - United States comedian who pioneered comedy television shows (born 1922)
Translations

Caesar

[ˈsiːzəʳ] NCésar

Caesar

nCäsar m, → Caesar m

Caesar

[ˈsiːzəʳ] nCesare m
References in classic literature ?
Of those that began great and ended in a point, there are thousands of examples, for all the Pharaohs and Ptolemies of Egypt, the Caesars of Rome, and the whole herd (if I may such a word to them) of countless princes, monarchs, lords, Medes, Assyrians, Persians, Greeks, and barbarians, all these lineages and lordships have ended in a point and come to nothing, they themselves as well as their founders, for it would be impossible now to find one of their descendants, and, even should we find one, it would be in some lowly and humble condition.
So that in spite of edicts, ordinances, and decrees, there he is, captain of the Musketeers; that is to say, chief of a legion of Caesars, whom the king holds in great esteem and whom the cardinal dreads--he who dreads nothing, as it is said.
It may, therefore, be easily imagined there is no scarcity of guides at the Colosseum, that wonder of all ages, which Martial thus eulogizes: "Let Memphis cease to boast the barbarous miracles of her pyramids, and the wonders of Babylon be talked of no more among us; all must bow to the superiority of the gigantic labor of the Caesars, and the many voices of Fame spread far and wide the surpassing merits of this incomparable monument.
The dark and fearful sea of the subtle Ulysses' wanderings, agitated by the wrath of Olympian gods, harbouring on its isles the fury of strange monsters and the wiles of strange women; the highway of heroes and sages, of warriors, pirates, and saints; the workaday sea of Carthaginian merchants and the pleasure lake of the Roman Caesars, claims the veneration of every seaman as the historical home of that spirit of open defiance against the great waters of the earth which is the very soul of his calling.
Then it was that the fortified camp of the Caesars developed into the castle of the king.
It was not only the old lion argent that was roaring in my ear, but all the eagles of the Caesars seemed flapping and screaming in pursuit of me.
Within the space of a mile from its outskirts every irregularity of the soil was prehistoric, every channel an undisturbed British trackway; not a sod having been turned there since the days of the Caesars.
A few days after his brief interview with her mother, he encountered her in that beautiful abode of flowering desolation known as the Palace of the Caesars.
About his feet is spread the remnant of a city that once had a population of four million souls; and among its massed edifices stand the ruins of temples, columns, and triumphal arches that knew the Caesars, and the noonday of Roman splendor; and close by them, in unimpaired strength, is a drain of arched and heavy masonry that belonged to that older city which stood here before Romulus and Remus were born or Rome thought of.
I have heard of the gladiatorial shows of the Caesars, and of the Spanish bull-fights, but I take the liberty of doubting if either of them could be half so horrible as this Kukuana witch-hunt.
The King of Prussia sends his wife to seek the great man's mercy; the Emperor of Austria considers it a favor that this man receives a daughter the Caesars into his bed; the Pope, the guardian of all that the nations hold sacred, utilizes religion for the aggrandizement of the great man.
I have not looked at his Twelve Caesars for twice as many years, but I should be greatly surprised to find it other than one of the greatest historical monographs ever written.