Cahokia


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Ca·ho·ki·a

 (kə-hō′kē-ə)
A village of southwest Illinois, a suburb of St. Louis, Missouri. It is located on the site of a large Mississippian settlement (c. 800-1350) with numerous extant earthworks.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It's been four years since the 'Cats last advanced to the sectional finals, where they fell to Cahokia, and 28 years (1990) since they last won a sectional, beating Benton, 82-56.
In his book Collapse: How societies choose to fail or survive, Jared Diamond writes movingly about the collapse of the Anasazi and Cahokia, the Mayan cities of Central America, and the Great Zimbabwe in Africa.
The partnership includes joint ownership and operation of the barge, truck and rail terminal at Cahokia, Ill.
It includes joint ownership and operation of the barge, truck, and rail terminal at Cahokia, Illinois, with frontage on the Mississippi River, as well as a grain origination agreement.
Target: Joint ownership and operation of Cahokia, Illinois terminal
Growing up in the 1970s, McMahon has vivid memories of visiting the Cahokia Mounds near her hometown of St Louis in the United States.
It opens a paradoxical perspective on the multidimensionality of his Infinity Project--as well as that of his latest endeavor, which involves the repurposing of a disused Taco Bell in Cahokia, Illinois (just across the Mississippi River from Saint Louis), into a self-run and ideally permanent exhibition space for his art.
Attention has been focused on the extensive Indian settlements in and around Cahokia, on the Mississippi floodplain only about 30 km to the southeast (Emerson and Lewis 1991).
The site, named after a Chuck Berry song, is near the American Indian city of Cahokia, which was active about 1,000 years ago.
In "From Cahokia to Larson to Moundville", archaeologist A.
Louis area, visit the Cahokia Mounds, just across the river in Collinsville, IL.
This allowed Clark to capture Kaskaskia, Cahokia, and most dramatically Vincennes, in addition to leading incursions into Ohio to protect Kentucky.