Cahokia Mounds


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Cahokia Mounds

(kəˈhəʊkɪə)
pl n
(Placename) the largest group of prehistoric Indian earthworks in the US, located northeast of East St Louis

Ca•ho′ki•a Mounds′

(kəˈhoʊ ki ə)
n.pl.
a group of very large prehistoric Indian earthworks in SW Illinois.
References in periodicals archive ?
As many as 20,000 people -- double that if surrounding communities are included -- lived about 1,000 years ago in the elaborate planned city that now lies within the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site.
Growing up in the 1970s, McMahon has vivid memories of visiting the Cahokia Mounds near her hometown of St Louis in the United States.
Yet this entropic zone lies at the epicenter of pre-Columbian Mississippian culture; the famed earthworks known as the Cahokia Mounds loom not far away.
Use the glossary below to create a vocabulary activity: American Indian Caughnawaga Great moccasin tomahawk Spirit Movement (AIM) cliff hogan Mound totem dwellers Builders Anasazi comanchero Indian National tepee Territory Museum of atlatl coup Indian Wars the American travois Indian Basket Makers cradleboard Iroquois Native vision Confederacy American quest Bering Strait Dawes Act kachina Church wampum Black Hills earth lodge kiva potlatch wickiup Bureau of Indian Eastern Little Powhatan wigwam Affairs Woodlands Bighorn Confederacy (BIA) culture long house powwow Wounded Knee Cahokia Mounds Five medicine pueblo xat Civilized lodge Tribes Calumet Ghost Dance medicine sachem man Carlisle Indian sagamore School Visit www.
And he wants to pay tribute to the Native Americans who long ago lived in the area and created what is known as Cahokia mounds.
Specific texts and authors include The Epic of Gilgamesh in Mesopotamia, Thucydides on Greece and Persia, Cahokia mounds in the Mississippi trading zone, the Peace of Westphalia, Robert Boyle and James Watt on thermodynamics and the steam engine, Sun Yat Sen and the end of dynasty in China, Joseph Stalin on the American threat, V.
Saved from total destruction, the entire complex is now known as the Cahokia Mounds Historical Interpretive Site located in Collinsville, Illinois.