cailleach


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cailleach

(ˈkæljəx)
n
Scot an old woman
[Gaelic]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the introductory chapter 'Beginnings', Habertroh offers a cohesive raison d'etre for choosing this subject matter, demonstrating the ways in which Irish literature has long ignored women or cast them into stereotypes, as for example in the figure of the 'silent mother' or the 'puritanical morally good girl', or the well known aisling and cailleach figures.
Bha e na chuspair aig a' bhuthbhana nuair a nochd a' cailleach a bha seo a bha an-comhnaidh a gearan mu dheidhinn a slainte.
Gemma Jones is The Cailleach of the spirit world, Colin Morgan is Merlin, Richard Wilson is Gaius and John Hurt the Voice of the Dragon.
The jigs played during this programme are Up And About In The Morning and Willie Clancy's version of Cailleach An Airgid, The Hag With The Money.
The first section, "Cailleach," features cailleach or hag personae representing the "shadow" aspect or dark side of femininity that must be avowed and integrated into the self.
US poetry; Leanna O'Sullivan, 27 - Cailleach (Bloodaxe Books).
The Cailleach, The Thistle of Scotland THE reason the thistle became the national symbol of Scotland is open to question but one of the best stories involves the Danish army invading the Highlands in the 11th Century.
It is also said that one of the great enemies of the Fionna, the immense sea-hag, Cailleach Bheur, can spawn dragons from her corpse by contact with the sea: "A worm creeping out from one of her bones will on reaching water become a fierce dragon" (Mackenzie viii).
For the supernatural powers such as the corn spirit we also encounter anthropomorphic motivations such as, in Ireland, carlin, seanbhean, both meaning 'Old Woman', old maid, (old) hag, cailleach 'old hag', also meaning 'Old Woman'.
In that legend, the ancient hag Cailleach Bhearra leapt from hill to hill, forming cairns by dropping stones from her apron in a supernatural but ultimately unsuccessful bid for power (see O Crualaoich 1988 on the hag and McMann 1991 on links between passage tombs and legendary Irish females).
Indeed, the last essay by the poetess, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, |Mis and Dubh Ruis: A parable of Psychic Transformation' strikes to the root of an immemorial Irish literary tradition; that of the hag or cailleach signifying the tribal land she, when in the conjugal act with the rightful king, is then transformed into a beautiful goddess.
The walk, on Sunday, March 12, has been organised by the Crossroads Youth and Community Association - where Farah worked - and women's community arts group the Cailleach Collective.