Cajun

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Related to Cajuns: Cajun people

Ca·jun

also Ca·jan  (kā′jən)
n.
A member of a group of people in southern Louisiana descended from French colonists exiled from Acadia in the 1700s.
adj.
Of or relating to the Cajuns or their culture.

[Alteration of Acadian.]

Cajun

(ˈkeɪdʒən)
n
1. (Peoples) a native of Louisiana descended from 18th-century Acadian immigrants
2. (Languages) the dialect of French spoken by such people
3. (Music, other) the music of this ethnic group, combining blues and European folk music
adj
4. (Peoples) denoting, relating to, or characteristic of such people, their language, or their music
5. (Languages) denoting, relating to, or characteristic of such people, their language, or their music
6. (Music, other) denoting, relating to, or characteristic of such people, their language, or their music
[C19: alteration of Acadian; compare Injun for Indian]

Ca•jun

(ˈkeɪ dʒən)

n.
1. a member of the traditionally Roman Catholic, French-speaking population of rural S Louisiana, descended largely from French colonists expelled from Acadia in 1755–63.
2. the form of French spoken by the Cajuns.
[1875–80; aph. variant of Acadian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cajun - a Louisianian descended from Acadian immigrants from Nova Scotia (`Cajun' comes from `Acadian')
Acadian - an early French settler in the Maritimes
Translations
cadien

Cajun

[ˈkeɪdʒən]
A. ADJcajún
Cajun cookerycocina f tipo cajún
B. N
1. (= person) → cajún mf
2. (Ling) → cajún m
CAJUN
A los habitantes del sur de Luisiana que hablan un dialecto francés se les llama Cajuns. Son los descendientes de los canadienses franceses expulsados de Nueva Escocia por los británicos en 1755, llamada entonces Acadia (Cajun es la forma acortada de Acadian). El dialecto combina francés arcaico con inglés y español, junto con algunas palabras y frases hechas indias. Tanto su comida picante como su música se conocen hoy en el mundo entero.

Cajun

[ˈkeɪdʒən]
adj [music, food, area] → cajun inv
n
(= person) → Cajun mf
(LINGUISTICS) (= language) → cajun m
References in periodicals archive ?
Bangor-based Cajuns Denbo began singing in English and French, but now perform the majority of their material in Welsh rather than Cajun French.
This introductory study has its origins in her dissertation at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Her focus is on the evolution of the "path Cajuns took from their Acadian identifications to an all-American, yet different, notion of self" (3) in work by writers within this ethnic group and beyond it.
Rise of the Cajun Mariners: The Race for Big Oil is an up-close and personal glimpse into the cutthroat history of the oilfield boat business, which was born in Louisiana's bayou country and pioneered by Cajuns.
Born and raised in Morgan City, Louisiana, he grew up among blue-collar Cajuns.
If god had to pick one person that all Cajuns could emulate, it would be Jake Delhomme.
The racist messages I received while growing up were much stronger than the homophobic messages," he says, explaining that Cajuns, whose ancestors were brutally deported by the British from Acadia (now Nova Scotia) to Louisiana in the 1750s, have a long history of persecution and therefore seek another minority to malign.
CAJUNS are the descendants of French who began emigrating in the mid-1600s to Acadia, now Nova Scotia.
The Cajuns (short for Acadians) are descended from the French Canadians who were expelled from Nova Scotia--Acadiana to them--in 1755 by the British.
No longer isolated along the serpentine meanderings of small waterways, Cajuns still relish the convivial joie de vivre that characterizes their culture, one of the few in the United States defying assimilation.
Appearing on Friday night are Cajuns Denbo, a six piece band from Bangor who perform the majority of their material in their native Welsh language rather than Cajun French.
This part of Louisiana remained isolated and self-contained until the end of the nineteenth century, allowing the Cajuns and Creoles to develop close-knit ethnic communities.
I've never been to the real Mardi Gras,'' said Patrick Burnside, 50, who often speaks to Cajuns on his CB radio and was one of the first to pass through the gates at Saturday's 10th annual festival.