Calchas


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Calchas

(ˈkælkæs)
n
(European Myth & Legend) Greek myth a soothsayer who assisted the Greeks in the Trojan War
References in classic literature ?
With these words he sat down, and Calchas son of Thestor, wisest of augurs, who knew things past present and to come, rose to speak.
And Achilles answered, "Fear not, but speak as it is borne in upon you from heaven, for by Apollo, Calchas, to whom you pray, and whose oracles you reveal to us, not a Danaan at our ships shall lay his hand upon you, while I yet live to look upon the face of the earth--no, not though you name Agamemnon himself, who is by far the foremost of the Achaeans.
His heart was black with rage, and his eyes flashed fire as he scowled on Calchas and said, "Seer of evil, you never yet prophesied smooth things concerning me, but have ever loved to foretell that which was evil.
Placed in an envelope, and addressed to Fouquet, it had not even been divined by Planchet, who in divination was equal to Calchas or the Pythian Apollo.
Its subject, however, seems to have been the histories of famous seers like Mopsus, Calchas, and Teiresias, and it probably took its name from Melampus, the most famous of them all.
As Agamemnon, Ulysses, Nestor, Diomedes, Ajax, and Calchas enter in 2.
Furthermore, he was the one that promised protection to the clairvoyant Calchas in order to reveal the truth (he knew that Agamemnon was responsible for Apollo's wrath and so he was afraid of announcing it).
45) There are three instances from the Iliad, all using the same formulaic language, where gods liken themselves to humans in voice and build: Poseidon assimilating to Calchas at 13.
31) The fact that the sacrifice occurred in response to an oracle communicated from Artemis through the seer Calchas should not be adduced as an a priori justification for human sacrifice.
In our 2014 performances Iphigenia's words, 'I must goo from you unto such a place, from whence I shall never come again', recalled those who had been sent off by powerful military and spiritual leaders like Agamemnon, Menelaus, Ulysses, and Calchas, to die in the interests of national supremacy or religious fundamentalism.
Tristan Jones was a physically and vocally impressive Agamemnon, especially in Act III, where he clumped around in sparkly trunks and flippers, and Ronan MacParland was impressive in the comic role of the high priest, Calchas.
He says, for example, that Agamemnon's sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia was wrong; Agamemnon should not have listened to the priest Calchas.